Noticing and Naming in a Reading Lesson: Third Grade

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    • 00:10

      LEANNA HARRIS: One thing you'll notice in this co-teaching clipis how Sarah and Danielle were using the strategyof noticing and naming.They both had clipboards that had every single student'sname, and they had the learning targets on thereto keep them focused about what they were looking for.And then every time they came togetherto talk about what they thought, they

    • 00:32

      LEANNA HARRIS [continued]: were able to notice it and name what they thoughtthose group of students needed.And those were the students who they pulled immediatelyfor small group instruction.

    • 00:41

      DIANE SWEENEY: And this continual form of assessmentis really a key part of student-centered coachingand just good teaching in general.We want to continually assess.We want to be pinpointing continually where kids are,and acting very quickly when we need to in the classroom.And that's what you saw during this lesson.

    • 01:03

      DANIELLE DEMER: Let's review what we're going to do first.First, Mrs. Tierney and I have got an article for youthat you are actually going to go back and read first.Then, in your reading notebooks, you should open them upto the next clean page, and we'regoing to do our double bubble.Are we going to draw a bunch of circles and lines everywhere?

    • 01:24

      DANIELLE DEMER [continued]: No.The first thing I want is I want to seeyour main idea at the top.

    • 01:28

      DANIELLE DEMER (VOICEOVER): I thoughtthat was really helpful to think of my main ideafirst before going into the rest of it, before trying to sort.I see some people are saying, me, too.Before going into important and interesting--I think that that's great.

    • 01:42

      DANIELLE DEMER: If that's a strategy thatworks best for you, I'm going to try and have everybody do that.So read the article, take out your reading notebook,and then come up with your main idea.And then you can start your double bubble now.

    • 01:52

      SARA TIERNEY: So if you're having trouble gettingstarted, the first thing you do is--let's read it together.Of all the strange and wonderful creaturesthat move in the ocean, one stands out above the rest.It is the amazing octopus.Circle "amazing octopus," because that is the author'sreally trying for you--that's going to be the whole article.

    • 02:14

      SARA TIERNEY [continued]: That's what readers do.They circle words that they think, this must be important."There are over 300 different types of octopus,and they can be found in every ocean in the world.The octopus has a body unlike any other animal."Listen to that sentence."The octopus has a body unlike any other animal."What is this whole paragraph going to be about?

    • 02:34

      STUDENT: A body.

    • 02:34

      SARA TIERNEY: A body.So what word should be circle?

    • 02:37

      STUDENT: A body.

    • 02:38

      SARA TIERNEY: Body.Circle octopus's body.

    • 02:40

      DANIELLE DEMER: Now, why are those things that you justsaid--why are they important?What's the author trying to tell you about the octopus?Don't they talk about how their body works, too?Is that trying to tell you that they're not dangerous?

    • 02:57

      SARA TIERNEY: Can I tell you whatI'm noticing about these guys?

    • 02:60

      DANIELLE DEMER: Yeah.

    • 03:02

      SARA TIERNEY: They don't really know how to read the article.So as they're reading, they're not finding the main idea,because they feel like everything's equal weight.Does that make sense?So what I was thinking-- maybe I might pull a small groupand talk to them about how do you know--

    • 03:19

      DANIELLE DEMER: I just talked to Charlie about that, too.

    • 03:22

      SARA TIERNEY: So maybe let me pull that group,and you grab Charlie.And then we walk around real fast and see who else.

    • 03:27

      DANIELLE DEMER: Guys, can I tell you guys something really fast?And I think that this is where we'regetting a little bit confused right now.I know we just read an article about strange animals,but why we should appreciate them.Did this article come from that book?

    • 03:42

      STUDENT: No.

    • 03:42

      DANIELLE DEMER: No.I think some of you guys are getting caught upon trying to say things like the octopus is strangebut we should still appreciate it and we should still love it.And I kind of want you to think about it with a different lens,because that's not what this article is saying.Because it's not from the same book.It has a different purpose, meaning

    • 04:02

      DANIELLE DEMER [continued]: that it has a different main idea than whatwe were talking about before.Does that make sense?We work together once to twice a week.It depends.And I feel like it was so beneficial for the kids,because she gets to come in.And not only is she another set of eyesaround the classroom, which I think people often thinkis the thing when you teach with a co-teacher,

    • 04:25

      DANIELLE DEMER [continued]: but she is like a sounding board.And it's so nice that we can go and kind of play offof each other.And since she is an expert in a lot of these strategiesthat we're using, it's nice to be able to hear her ideas.

Noticing and Naming in a Reading Lesson: Third Grade

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Abstract

Danielle Demer and Sara Tierney demonstrate co-teaching using the strategy of noticing and naming. This continual form of assessment is a key part of student-centered coaching.

Noticing and Naming in a Reading Lesson: Third Grade

Danielle Demer and Sara Tierney demonstrate co-teaching using the strategy of noticing and naming. This continual form of assessment is a key part of student-centered coaching.

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