Discovering Sociology: Gender & Society

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    • 00:04

      DAINA S. EGLITIS: If it has ever seemed to you like thereare more women in your classes-- or at your college-- than thereare men, statistics suggest that it's not your imagination.Today, more women than men enroll in collegeand complete college.In fact, women have dominated college enrollments numericallysince about the early 1980s.

    • 00:24

      DAINA S. EGLITIS [continued]: As men's enrollments have stagnated while women's grew.

    • 00:29

      DAINA S. EGLITIS: According to the US Bureauof Labor Statistics, in 2012, about 71%of female high school graduates went on to higher education.By comparison, about 61% of male high school graduatesenrolled in higher education.

    • 00:49

      DAINA S. EGLITIS [continued]: In the past, women were actively discouragedfrom pursuing higher education.Historically, powerful obstacles stood in the way,like beliefs about women's capacityto succeed simultaneously in both educationand reproduction.

    • 01:03

      DAINA S. EGLITIS: In the late 19th century, for instance,a Harvard physician offered the idea of the brain-womb conflictto argue that women should not exert themselveson intellectual pursuits.Today, however, women make up the greater shareof college students.Particularly at private colleges.

    • 01:21

      WILLIAM J. CHAMBLISS: So what kinds of sociological factorsexplain the continued rise of women's enrollmentand the relative stagnation of male enrollment?Why are more women but fewer men going on to higher education?

    • 01:37

      DAINA S. EGLITIS: And why are more womenthan men staying to completely college with a degree?By age 24, about 28% of women todayhad earned a bachelor's degree, while 19% of men had done so.The gap also varies by race and ethnicity.So while the gap is smaller for whites and Asians,it's larger in the black and Hispanic populations.

    • 02:01

      DAINA S. EGLITIS [continued]: In chapter 9 we look at the skewed enrollmentratio in higher education.And we consider some of the key reasons for this,including men's low rates of high school completionand women's higher grades.

    • 02:15

      WILLIAM J. CHAMBLISS: Interestingly, mencontinue to earn higher scores on the SAT college preparatoryexam, particularly in math.We'll look into that issue and whatmight be behind it as well.

    • 02:29

      DAINA S. EGLITIS: Women's advancementsin higher education represent an important social transformationthat has supported greater opportunities for womenindividually and as a group.But this change is only part of a story that still finds womenearning less on average than their male counterpartsin the workforce.And reaching fewer positions at the top of the corporate ladder

    • 02:50

      DAINA S. EGLITIS [continued]: in politics.As well, women around the globe remaindeeply vulnerable to violence and exploitation.

    • 02:59

      WILLIAM J. CHAMBLISS: And societal prejudicesaffect both men and women who do not behavein accord with community norms.Gays, lesbians, transgendered individuals,and others who do gender differentlyare frequently subject to ostracism, discrimination,

    • 03:19

      WILLIAM J. CHAMBLISS [continued]: and abuse.This chapter looks into all of these important topics.

    • 03:25

      DAINA S. EGLITIS: Gender still matters in our social world.It is a social category that can offer opportunitiesand construct obstacles.Sociology gives us the opportunityto better understand the multitude of waysthat gender is part of our micro level and macro levelexperiences.So let's begin.

Discovering Sociology: Gender & Society

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Abstract

Professors William Chambliss and Daina Eglitis discuss gender and gender inequalities in higher education.

Discovering Sociology: Gender & Society

Professors William Chambliss and Daina Eglitis discuss gender and gender inequalities in higher education.

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