Consumer Driven Urban Development

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    Auto-Scroll: ONOFF 
    • 00:00

      [MUSIC PLAYING]

    • 00:12

      JEFF FERRELL: Well, perhaps the dominant trendin urban development and urban economies in the US and Europehas been the idea of creating a high end consumption zones.What economists call consumer driven urban development.And the argument is that with a new professional classof artists and thinkers and digital tech folks,these are where cities will grow.

    • 00:33

      JEFF FERRELL [continued]: And to some degree, that's true.The old factory economies of the urban areasare long gone, then relocated to the third-world.And so the engine in many cities of growthis now tourism, the restaurant industry, the hotel industry,high end boutiques, this sort of thing.This typically is seen as a unquestionable good,that this means the areas are getting better, quality of life

    • 00:54

      JEFF FERRELL [continued]: is improving, there's more attractionas the city is now more amenable to friendlinessand everyday life.What we have cultural criminologistshave increasingly begun to do research on and write about,are the hidden consequences of this.And there are number of them.One is that when you see the new boutique or the coffee shopoften what you're, in some ways are seeing

    • 01:14

      JEFF FERRELL [continued]: is the ghost of the old flophouse or working classneighborhood that was raised to build that.Developers like cheap land not expensive land.So typically we see skid rows and areaswhere homeless folks gathered.Again working class- older working class neighborhoodsbeing destroyed and in their place rises, then mixed usedevelopments or million dollar condos.

    • 01:36

      JEFF FERRELL [continued]: So on the one level, then that as geographers says,a sort of revanchist approach that is, taking the city backfrom those who live there for another group of people.But more generally there's a differencebetween the factory work of 50 or 100 years agoand the service economies and the consumer economiesof today.And that is the nature of work and the natureof the terms of employment.And that is that these new economies

    • 01:58

      JEFF FERRELL [continued]: are built almost entirely on minimum wage labor, temp work,on demand call-ins, where a service worker or a waitressor waiter doesn't know if they'll evenhave a shift tomorrow, the last minute sourcing of labor.And so what we're creating in that sense some of ustalk about is drift.We're creating a world of people who are adrift from certainties

    • 02:20

      JEFF FERRELL [continued]: of income.Who don't know if they'll be able to pay their rentor where they'll be employed.The sort of gig economy which is a euphemismI think for this kind of fragile, precarious work.So one issue for cultural commonalitiesis that hidden in that boutique arethat high end hotel or that new mixed use developmentis not only the ghost of other economiesand other ways of living but a sort of sub

    • 02:41

      JEFF FERRELL [continued]: strata of impoverished workers, peoplewho have less citizenship of the city,less stability in some ways less of a stake in urban life.So in that sense, a dividing of the city really between thosewho can afford to consume and thosewho are offering that consumption but on termsthat don't afford them economic survival.

    • 03:02

      JEFF FERRELL [continued]: So far, we haven't talked much about crime thoughor criminal justice.And here is where, for many of us, it gets interesting.Because we're also seeing is that,and I found this in my research all over the United Statesand Europe, is that increasingly developers, urban leaders, cityfathers and mothers argue that the city is nowselling its own image.That what draws people to Washington D.C. Or SanFrancisco or London is the image of London.

    • 03:24

      JEFF FERRELL [continued]: The experience of it as a place of pleasures, and consumption,and perception.And this means now that policing is increasingly the policingof the city's image.So what we're now seeing is policing strategiesthat are really not about preventing crimeas much as they are about controlling what visitorsand consumers see in the city.Which in turn has met rounding up homeless communities.

    • 03:45

      JEFF FERRELL [continued]: In Hawaii right now, homeless campsare being dispersed and driven outbecause of the fear that touristswon't come to the beaches if they see a homeless person.In London, there are now sharpenedspikes planted in front of major department storesand under bridges in central London,so that the homeless folks and immigrants can't sleepor lie down their.Park benches that are rounded so that you

    • 04:06

      JEFF FERRELL [continued]: can't sit for long without becoming uncomfortable therebydriving those who might loiter or need a place to sit outof public areas.So we're seeing a real shift in policingand some policing strategist call this place based policing.That is driving undesirable populations out of placesthat would interrupt consumption or make the city in some ways,look different.

    • 04:27

      JEFF FERRELL [continued]: So for us, as cultural criminologist,then there's a really dark, hidden sideto the pleasures of a good cappuccino or a high endseafood restaurant.Which is not only a disenfranchised groupof people but also models of policing that I would argue,many cultural criminalized would argue,are undemocratic or really not focused on crime

    • 04:47

      JEFF FERRELL [continued]: but are focused on exclusion from shared spaces.And that create then a whole new dynamicin the city, where the city is in some ways only availableto those who can afford to purchase itor to purchase this image.But it's increasingly not a place of fluid interaction.We're different kinds of run into each other,strike up conversations, learn from one another,create that democratic urbanism that

    • 05:08

      JEFF FERRELL [continued]: really has been the heart of cities in America and Europe.So again, as we enjoy a custom madeartisanal belt or a hot cappuccinowe have to think about that this is actuallyan issue of crime and justice, an issue of democracy,of public access.That's all hidden away.Those meanings, those symbols are there to be readbut are meant not to be read in the interest of the new kind

    • 05:31

      JEFF FERRELL [continued]: of consumer driven urbanism.

Consumer Driven Urban Development

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Abstract

Professor Jeff Ferrell explains how consumption-driven urban development leads to greater disenfranchisement of the low-income workers who make such consumption possible. This model also motivates cities and police to criminalize phenomena (such as homelessness) that make potential shoppers uncomfortable.

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Consumer Driven Urban Development

Professor Jeff Ferrell explains how consumption-driven urban development leads to greater disenfranchisement of the low-income workers who make such consumption possible. This model also motivates cities and police to criminalize phenomena (such as homelessness) that make potential shoppers uncomfortable.

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