Communicating Effectively with Students

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    • 00:05

      [Communicating Effectively With Students]

    • 00:10

      LISA SIGAFOOS: There's also re-enforcements of,like, we do use stickers on a chartbecause students like that.They see the work.And as they gain stickers, they're seeing, OK,I'm working hard.I'm accomplishing the tasks that I need.And you're pairing that with the praise, so letting themknow why they're earning the stickers every time.And it just helps them keep working hard.

    • 00:31

      LISA SIGAFOOS [continued]: And they're trying to earn as many--that sticker or reward as possible.Also a reward at the end, like, theyget to pick a snack for their hard work,especially because this is additional.Sometimes it's hard for kids to wantto do additional work outside of their regular classroom,such a small group work.So it's really encouraging that this is important to them,

    • 00:53

      LISA SIGAFOOS [continued]: and that they're learning, and that their work is reallyappreciated by you, the teacher.And so that's how rewards really help them.

    • 01:02

      JAN EVANS: It really doesn't matter how large or smallyour class is, never will everyone be listening.[LAUGHS]So you give the directions very clearly.Then you have the students repeat the directions twoor three times.

    • 01:23

      JAN EVANS [continued]: And then you still have those few that you have to go toand say, here's what we're doing.And that's just working with children.That's just part of working with children,understanding that some of them are able to listen and followdirections.Others have to repeat it and then they get it.

    • 01:44

      JAN EVANS [continued]: And then there's the ones that are just totallytheir own little island.And you go and tell them one-on-one.What shape is this trunk?

    • 01:52

      SPEAKER 1: A triangle!

    • 01:54

      JAN EVANS: Is it a triangle?

    • 01:54

      SPEAKER 1: Rectangle!

    • 01:55

      SPEAKER 2: Rectangle.

    • 01:56

      SPEAKER 3: Rectangle.

    • 01:57

      JAN EVANS: OK, we have to decide.Is this a triangle or a rectangle?OK?If you think it's a rectangle, put your thumb up.Rectangle.OK?If you think it's a triangle, could you hold hand up.So everybody thinks it's a rectangle?

    • 02:16

      GROUP: Yes.

    • 02:17

      JAN EVANS: That's because you're all smart.And that's right.It is a rectangle.Let's count our apples by twos.OK, you count the apples on your tree.I'm gonna count mine.Two, four, six, eight, nine.Just look at the yellow apples.Count them and put the answers there.

    • 02:38

      JAN EVANS [continued]: Look at your number chart.I don't want any backwards fours or threes.Then just look at the red apples.Start--So you have to realize that childrenthat young live in the moment.And so you are constantly having to bring themback and get their attention and make sure

    • 02:58

      JAN EVANS [continued]: they're still on task.The most important element of that is staying positive.These children do not respond to a gruff demand.They respond to love and attention.

    • 03:18

      JAN EVANS [continued]: And they respond to respect.And so we think up fun ways to do it.Class class, class?And they'll answer, yes, yes, yes.And next time, it'll be something different.I change it up.I might say, counting down from four, or 10, or something.And they'll start scrambling.

    • 03:40

      JAN EVANS [continued]: As soon as I get frustrated, they stop listening.So I have to maintain my calm and constantly bring them backby maybe introducing some movement.Because maybe they've been sitting too long.And they're young.So we may stand up and wiggle or something.

    • 04:03

      JAN EVANS [continued]: And then, they're able to draw their attention backto the lesson, back to what we're trying to say.And every time you want to say anything to all of them,you have to try to get their attention, whichis quite often.And like I said, you have to switch it up a lotand always be kind.

    • 04:24

      JAN EVANS [continued]: [LAUGHS]If I see that something is taking too long,I can tell them, OK, boys and girls, wehave three minutes to finish this project.And then in a little while, say, we have one minute,one minute warning.And they understand that.They understand that they then haveto hurry up and get finished so we can go on to the next part,

    • 04:48

      JAN EVANS [continued]: especially if I have most of my kidsfinished and ready to go on, and a few thatare still messing around.(SINGS) You put your right foot in.You put your right foot out.You put your right foot in, and you shake it all about.You do the hoochie-goochie and you turn yourself about.

    • 05:09

      JAN EVANS [continued]: Now it is time to count by twos.And then we'll count by twos.You got it?OK, everybody know their right foot?Raise your right foot!All right.Here we go.(SINGS) You put your right-- you can sing.(SINGS) You put your right foot in.You put your right foot out.You stand right there.--the right foot in, and you shake it all about.

    • 05:30

      JAN EVANS [continued]: You do the hoochie-goochie and you turn yourself about.Now it's the time to count by twos.Two, four, stepping in and out, eight, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20.Put your right--

Communicating Effectively with Students

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Abstract

Teachers Lisa Sigafoos and Jan Evans describe their strategies for communicating effectively with students.

Communicating Effectively with Students

Teachers Lisa Sigafoos and Jan Evans describe their strategies for communicating effectively with students.

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