Addressing Disruptive Behaviors

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    • 00:03

      [Addressing Disruptive Behaviors]

    • 00:06

      REBECCA SAN SEBASTIAN: We have to breathe the air.Let me tell you something a little bit tricky.The planes go in the air, and the balloonsgo in the air, but the spaceships--Alex, guess what?The spaceships do not go in the air.You knew that?Tell me what you know.

    • 00:27

      REBECCA SAN SEBASTIAN [continued]: Sit your bottom down.

    • 00:28

      SPEAKER: They go in space.

    • 00:29

      REBECCA SAN SEBASTIAN: They go in space.And guess what?There's no air in outer space, is there?So you know what happens when the astronauts goto outer space?They bring some air with them.So obviously, the job of a teacheris to instruct, to give information.And when kids are showing behaviors

    • 00:51

      REBECCA SAN SEBASTIAN [continued]: that need to be addressed, that can be a big distraction.So the goal is to minimize those distractions.And if you can just give a look, you know,and your kids know what that look means,or if you can give a little verbal reminder,like I need your eyes on me or I need your bottom on the floor.I had a student whose button fell off his jacket.I could have stopped everything to kind of problem-solve

    • 01:13

      REBECCA SAN SEBASTIAN [continued]: with him and figure out what we weregoing to do with that button.But I just kind of gave him a solutionthat I thought he would feel comfortable with,and let him know that I would deal with that later.And he trusts me and knows that that's something that Iwill follow through with.The most important thing a teacher can do in orderto have a good control of her classis have relationships with her kids.

    • 01:34

      REBECCA SAN SEBASTIAN [continued]: So my kids know that I care about them,that I'm here for them, that my goal is for them to learn.When they know that, then they'regoing to want to behave for me.And there are some kids who are going to need reminders.And for some kids, the reminders are reallygoing to be better if they're positive.

    • 01:54

      REBECCA SAN SEBASTIAN [continued]: So when I catch them doing something correctly,then I'm going to want to reinforce that.When I see somebody else doing something positively,and I reinforce what they're doing,it might give them that reminder.And then there are some kids thatjust need to be told no, you're not going to act that way.There was a little boy squirming around on the carpet.His goal was to get to the back of the carpet.

    • 02:15

      REBECCA SAN SEBASTIAN [continued]: You know, I gave him a look.He, you know, declined.He, you know, chose to ignore it.And I said, you need to sit up here.And he's going to.He knows that, if he's not sitting up there, that--well first, he doesn't want to disappoint me.So, you know-- but there are some people who will then try

    • 02:36

      REBECCA SAN SEBASTIAN [continued]: and take it to the next level.I make phone calls home.I speak with them when the class timeis over, let them know what I expect from them.You have to have very clear expectations.You have to be consistent with how you're goingto enforce your expectations.And then there are some people thatwill need positive or negative consequences if they're not

    • 02:56

      REBECCA SAN SEBASTIAN [continued]: following through.

Addressing Disruptive Behaviors

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Abstract

Rebecca San Sebastian explains how she deals with disruptive behavior in the classroom.

Addressing Disruptive Behaviors

Rebecca San Sebastian explains how she deals with disruptive behavior in the classroom.

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