SAGE Video: Course Playlists - Psychology

Don’t know where to start? Explore our award-winning content through custom course playlists as well as some of our Editors' picks.

  • Clinical/Abnormal Psychology

    Professor Amy Wenzel discusses the fields of psychopathology and abnormal psychology, particularly highlighting her work in postpartum anxiety and suicidality. She explains the controversies surrounding the new DSM, including the medicalization of everyday experiences and the writers' ties to the pharmaceutical industry. She also explores therapeutic innovations and where she sees psychology headed.
    Professor William Ray discusses evolutionary and abnormal psychology, as well as how they relate to each other. Evolutionary psychology looks at how disorders have changed over time and gives a new perspective on psychopathology. Abnormal psychology studies different mental disorders and the underlying mechanisms of mental illness.
    David Baddiel explores different types of education and learning strategies. He examines two contradictory ideas: that humans are born with the abilities they will always have and that brains are constantly changing. He looks at experiments on learning, including the use of cash incentives in schools.
  • Lifespan & Developmental Psychology

    Professor Patrick Leman discusses gender development and how gender differences and stereotypes lead to inequalities. He points out studies have shown significant gender factors in how adults treat babies and what children learn about occupations.
    Dr. Richard De Visser describes developmental psychology through a biopsychosocial perspective that considers debates about nature and nurture and looks at the development of individuals within their social context.
    Professor Patrick Leman discusses the importance of child development. The immense amount of learning that happens during childhood allows children to develop into competent adults. There is increasing evidence that many psychological problems can be tied to negative childhood experiences.
  • Applied Psychology

    Professor Randall Engle discusses the field of working psychology, which is centered around the idea that the information that you can remember is relatively limited. He talks about how attention is related to this field, because it is not just about remembering information but also about remembering the information while there are other things happening trying to distract your attention.
    In conversation with Howard Burton, Professor Steven Kosslyn explains his understanding of a top brain/bottom brain, in contrast to the popular idea of a right and left brain. He discusses different cognitive modes and the testing involved in scientific psychology.
    Professor John Wixted discusses human memory. Human memory is a field that requires knowledge in both psychology and neuroscience. He talks about why he got into the field and what students should do if they want to do the same.
  • Social Psychology

    Dr. Catherine Borshuk presents an overview of the study into altruism. Starting with the now-debunked story of the attack on Kitty Genovese, Borshuk examines the bystander effect, righteous Gentiles, nurturing behavior, and gender/culture differences in altruistic behavior.
    Dr. Keon West explains that it is difficult to make broad factual claims about prejudice and discrimination, but careful scientific experiments can show evidence of discriminatory attitudes. He highlights his findings on the question, "Do people judge Muslims more harshly than white non-Muslims?"
    Professor Susan Fiske defines dual process theories as the ways people make sense of the world around them. These processes can occur automatically and immediately or more deliberately.
  • Research Methods & Data Analysis in Psychology

    Dr. David Dunning discusses the field of self and identity. He describes how he got into the field, how others can get into the field, and why it is important in society.
    Prof. Jean Twenge addresses the role of cultural psychology in understanding our world and how it changes, particularly over time. She describes the importance of appreciating generational differences and of the various ways we learn to be a member of society.
    Prof. Jean Twenge addresses the role of cultural psychology in understanding our world and how it changes, particularly over time. She describes the importance of appreciating generational differences and of the various ways we learn to be a member of society.