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SBC Author Profile: Ernest Baskin

Dr. Ernest Baskin

Dr. Ernest Baskin is an  assistant professor of food marketing at Saint Joseph's University. He is an expert in consumer behavior and marketing research. His research focuses on consumer judgment and decision making with a particular interest in consumption decisions as well as consumer biases and context effects using experimental methodology and survey design. His work has been published in top tier journals such as the Journal of Consumer Research and the Journal of Marketing Research and has been extensively covered in the popular press in outlets such as the ranging from print sources such as the Chicago Tribune and the Atlantic to blogs such as Lifehacker and Nerdwallet. He is often a featured expert on both television and radio. 

He has worked extensively with a variety of firms on major marketing and behavioral initiatives, including Google and Pepsico. Prior to joining Saint Joseph's, Ernest worked as a marketing consultant at ZS Associates in Philadelphia, PA and advised on marketing efforts, market research and mergers for a number of major pharmaceutical companies. He holds a Bachelors of Science in Economics and a Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania and a Ph.D. from the Yale School of Management.

  • Cases from Ernest on SAGE Business Cases

  • Q&A with Ernest

    Q: How do you integrate cases into your classes?

    A: In my classes, cases are an important way to give theories life. In particular, while a lot of my material may be theoretical or discuss major frameworks, cases function as a way for students to apply those frameworks to real-world examples.

    Q: How do students respond to the cases?

    A: In my classes, cases are an important way to give theories life. In particular, while a lot of my material may be theoretical or discuss major frameworks, cases function as a way for students to apply those frameworks to real-world examples.

    Q: Do you have any tips for those who are new to cases and want to use them in courses?

    A: It is important to understand what you want to get out of a case. In particular, what ideas do you want a student to retain? This allows you to focus the discussion more effectively. In addition, it is important to prepare for teaching a case by understanding how much time you should devote to each section based on its importance to you and your classroom.

    Q: Do you have any case writing advice for those who’d like to get started?

    A: Start with an important phenomenon in the corporate world and expand upon it. Then, think about how that phenomenon can illustrate concepts that you regularly teach in your classes.

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