Qualitative research design is continually evolving. It is not only more established in disciplines beyond the traditional social sciences in which it is a standard choice, but also just as impacted by the changes in what data, technologies, and approaches researchers are using. This Handbook takes readers through the foundational theories, functions, strategies, and approaches to qualitative research design, before showcasing how it negotiates different data and research environments and produces credible, actionable impact beyond the study. Containing contributions from over 90 top scholars from a range of social science disciplines, this Handbook is not just an anthology of different qualitative research designs and how/when to use them; it is a complete exploration of how and why these designs are shaped and how, why, and into what they are evolving. This is a valuable resource for Master's and PhD level students, faculty members, and researchers across a wide range of disciplines such as health, nursing, psychology, social work, sociology, and education. Volume One: Part I: Concepts of Designing Designs in Qualitative Research; Part 2: Theories and Epistemological Contexts of Designing Qualitative Research; Part 3: Elements of Designing Qualitative Research; Part 4: Basic Designs and Research Strategies in Qualitative Research; and Part 5: Mixing Methods in Designing Qualitative Research. Volume Two: Part 6: Designing Qualitative Research for Specific Kinds of Data; Part 7: Designing Qualitative Online and Multimodal Research; Part 8: Designing Qualitative Research for Specific Groups and Areas; Part 9: Designing Qualitative Research in Disciplinary Fields; and Part 10: Designing Qualitative Research for Impact.

Chapter 2: Reflexive Design in Qualitative Research

Reflexive Design in Qualitative Research

Reflexive design in qualitative research
Mats Alvesson Jörgen Sandberg Katja Einola

Introduction

Research is typically portrayed as a rational and transparent process in both methodology textbooks and published work. Researchers develop scientific knowledge by following a number of logical steps. Alternatively, as in some qualitative work, research is more data-driven, where the empirical material is expected to lead the way to the development of theory. Behind this thinking is the idea that research must be constrained and framed by the notion of scientific rationality (Sandberg and Tsoukas, 2011). The idea – or rather the ideal – of scientific rationality rests on the premise that objective and valid knowledge can be attained by ...

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