This Handbook provides an up-to-date discussion of the central issues in nonverbal communication and examines the research that informs these issues. Editors Valerie Manusov and Miles Patterson bring together preeminent scholars, from a range of disciplines, to reveal the strength of nonverbal behavior as an integral part of communication.

Chapter 19: The Interaction Management Function of Nonverbal Cues: Theory and Research About Mutual Behavioral Influence in Face-to-Face Settings

The Interaction Management Function of Nonverbal Cues: Theory and Research About Mutual Behavioral Influence in Face-to-Face Settings

The interaction management function of nonverbal cues: Theory and research about mutual behavioral influence in face-to-face settings

There are two important senses in which conversations are regulated. The more typical connotation of the word regulate implies that a person seeks intentionally to alter the content, tenor, or events of a conversation toward some preordained end. Regulation of this type exhibits control in the sense that actions are undertaken to achieve what one perceives to be an important need or purpose. Such conversational behaviors are sometimes called “deliberate.” The second sense assumes that regulation of interaction is more “automatic” (i.e., weighed less cognitively; for more on this topic, see Lakin, ...

  • Loading...
locked icon

Sign in to access this content

Get a 30 day FREE TRIAL

  • Watch videos from a variety of sources bringing classroom topics to life
  • Read modern, diverse business cases
  • Explore hundreds of books and reference titles