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Margie E. Lachman & Patricia A. Tun

In: Handbook of Cognitive Aging: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Chapter 30: Cognitive Testing in Large-Scale Surveys: Assessment by Telephone

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Cognitive Testing in Large-Scale Surveys: Assessment by Telephone
Cognitive testing in large-scale surveys: Assessment by telephone

Cognitive functioning is a key indicator of an individual's overall health and well-being, yet large-scale survey studies of aging typically do not examine cognition. Cognitive measures are seldom included in survey instruments, perhaps because it is assumed that reliable and valid assessments are too difficult and time consuming to administer in a survey format by lay interviewers. Assessment of cognitive functioning traditionally is carried out in person, usually in a laboratory or clinical setting by trained testers, using long, time-consuming batteries that include multiple measures of each cognitive domain of interest. Thus, many survey researchers have been reluctant to include cognitive assessment in their batteries even though there is increasing ...

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