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Mark A. McDaniel & Gilles O. Einstein

In: Handbook of Cognitive Aging: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Chapter 10: Prospective Memory and Aging: Old Issues and New Questions

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Prospective Memory and Aging: Old Issues and New Questions
Prospective memory and aging: Old issues and new questions

The topic of aging and cognition has been considered by scholars for the past 2,300 years, with most if not all approaches focused on noting and accounting for age-related decline in memory and cognitive function. Examples include Aristotle and Cicero from 1 to 300 BC, Tetens in the 18th century, and Angell and Miles in the early 20th century (see Surprenant, Bireta, & Farley, 2007, for an extended review). Until recently, however, aging researchers had not considered prospective memory. Prospective memory refers to remembering to execute an intended action at some appropriate moment in the future. This kind of memory task is ubiquitous in our everyday lives and ...

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