Although most mental health and behavioral health professionals have encountered adoption triad members—birth parents, adoptive parents, and adopted persons—in their clinical practice, the vast majority have had no formal or informal training on adoption issues. The Handbook of Adoption is the first text designed for mental health practitioners to specifically address the many dimensions of adoption-related issues which can and do affect adoption triad members, specifically in the United States.

Chapter 10: International Adoption of Latin American Children:Psychological Adjustment, Cultural, and Legal Issues

International Adoption of Latin American Children:Psychological Adjustment, Cultural, and Legal Issues

International adoption of latin american children: Psychologicaladjustment, cultural, and legal issues

In the United States, as well as in several other countries, the practice ofadopting children from foreign countries emerged in the post-World War II period(Lovelock, 2000; McRoy, 1991; Weil, 1984) as a response to the needs of thedisplaced children of Europe during and after the war. The firstprovision for intercountry adoption into the United States was PresidentTruman's directive of December 22, 1945, which allowed for the migrationof refugees and minors not accompanied by family members (Lovelock, 2000). Thechildren came primarily from Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and Germany. Theresponsibility for caring for these children fell on both the federal governmentand private agencies. Some of the ...

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