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For the first time, research on implicit cognitive processes relevant for the understanding of addictive behaviors and their prevention or treatment is brought together in one volume! The Handbook of Implicit Cognition and Addiction features the work of an internationally renowned group of contributing North American and European authors who draw together developments in basic research on implicit cognition with recent developments in addiction research. Editors Reinout W. Wiers and Alan W. Stacy examine recent findings from a variety of disciplines including basic memory and experimental psychology, experimental psychopathology, emotion, and neurosciences.

Chapter 22: To Drink or Not to Drink: The Role of Automatic and Controlled Cognitive Processes in the Etiology of Alcohol-Related Problems

To Drink or Not to Drink: The Role of Automatic and Controlled Cognitive Processes in the Etiology of Alcohol-Related Problems
To drink or not to drink: The role of automatic and controlled cognitive processes in the etiology of alcohol-related problems

Abstract: Explicit measures revealed three basic types of alcohol-related cognitions: positive reinforcement, negative reinforcement (relief), and negative expectancies. Using the same typology, we review studies assessing alcohol-related cognitions with implicit measures. Most research focused on automatic appetitive responses (positive reinforcement). The common model is that an automatic appetitive response tendency can be inhibited by more controlled inhibitory processes. In addition, there is scattered evidence indicating a role for automatic aversive responses to alcohol. Negative reinforcement appears to be more difficult to assess with tests involving single ...

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