For the most current, comprehensive resource in this rapidly evolving field, look no further than the Revised Edition of the Handbook of Science and Technology Studies. This masterful volume is the first resource in more than 15 years to define, summarize, and synthesize this complex multidisciplinary, international field. Tightly edited with contributions by an internationally recognized team of leading scholars, this volume addresses the crucial contemporary issues—both traditional and nonconventional—social studies, political studies, and humanistic studies in this changing field. Containing theoretical essays, extensive literature reviews, and detailed case studies, this remarkable volume clearly sets the standard for the field. It does nothing less than establish itself as the benchmark, one that will carry the field well into the next century. 

Chapter 26: Science, Technology, and the Military: Relations in Transition

Science, Technology, and the Military: Relations in Transition

Science, technology, and the military: Relations in transition
Wim A. Smit

IN his advice to the president immediately after World War II, Vannevar Bush (1945) stated: “There must be more—and more adequate—military research in peacetime. It is essential that the civilian scientists continue in peacetime some portion of those contributions to national security which they have made so effectively during the war” (p. 6). His advice stood in sharp contrast to Thomas Alvin Edison's suggestion, many years before, during World War I, to the Navy, that it should bring into the war effort at least one physicist in case it became necessary to “calculate something” (Gilpin, 1962, p. 10).

In the highly organized and concentrated effort during World War II, ...

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