Documentary and Archival Research

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Edited by: Jason Hughes & John Goodwin

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    • Publisher: SAGE Publications Ltd |
    • Publication Year: 2014 |
    • Online Publication Date: December 23, 2014 |
    • DOI: 10.4135/9781473915305 |
    • Print ISBN: 9781446210949 |
    • Online ISBN: 9781473915299 |
    • Series: SAGE Benchmarks in Social Research Methods |
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Abstract

This research tradition has arisen from a specific set of historical, disciplinary and institutional conditions. The very emergence of ‘documentation’ is predicated upon a set of long-term processes in which humans have developed the capacity to use symbols and store knowledge such that it can be exchanged and inter-generationally transmitted. Consisting of an impressive list of contributors, the four volumes discuss the history, development and current debates alive in the field, such as the biographical turn in social science, the theoretical underpinnings to using human documents in social research and the epistemological, substantive and practical concerns with the process of analyzing data from human documentary sources. Comprehensive, illuminating and dynamic, this collection will have appeal across all social science disciplines, especially sociology, social psychology, criminology, ...

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  • Editors’ Introduction: Human Documents and Archival Research
    JasonHughes and JohnGoodwin
    Introduction

    Our concern in these volumes is with a research tradition that engages centrally with sources that, in different ways, document human experience. Typically, such sources include ‘life documents’: letters, diaries, personal correspondence, narrative accounts, oral histories, and informal sources of data that are usually neglected by formal histories and official records. More recently, such sources have come to include electronic documents: blogs, micro-blogs, social networking sites, online forums, e-mail records, and so forth. As this array of examples might already serve to demonstrate, what constitutes a ‘document’, or ‘archive’ or, more generally, material that can be considered to serve as a legitimate source of data for social analysts concerned with researching human experience is by no ...

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