• Summary
  • Contents
  • Subject index

In recent years, tobacco politics has been a multi-layered issue fraught with significant legal, commercial, and public policy implications. From the outset, Martha A. Derthick's Up in Smoke took a nuanced look at tobacco politics in a new era of “adversarial legalism” and the consequences, both intended and unintended, of the MSA (Master Settlement Agreement).

Now, with a brand new 3rd edition, the book returns to “ordinary politics” and the passage of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act which gave the FDA broad authority to regulate both the manufacture and marketing of tobacco products. Derthick shows our political institutions working as they should, even if slowly, with partisanship and interest group activity playing their part in putting restraints on cigarette smoking.

The Ordinary Politics of Legislation
The ordinary politics of legislation

Official opposition to tobacco use is as old as the use itself. A sultan of Turkey and a czar of Russia put people to death for smoking, thus beating tobacco to the punch. The first known American crusader against smoking was a signer of the Declaration of Independence, Dr. Benjamin Rush of ...

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