• Summary
  • Contents
  • Subject index

The Judicial Process: Law, Courts, and Judicial Politics is an all-new, concise yet comprehensive core text that introduces students to the nature and significance of the judicial process in the United States and across the globe. It is social scientific in its approach, situating the role of the courts and their impact on public policy within a strong foundation in legal theory, or political jurisprudence, as well as legal scholarship. Authors Christopher P. Banks and David M. O’Brien do not shy away from the politics of the judicial process, and offer unique insight into cutting-edge and highly relevant issues. In its distinctive boxes, “Contemporary Controversies over Courts” and “In Comparative Perspective,” the text examines topics such as the dispute pyramid, the law and morality of same-sex marriages, the “hardball politics” of judicial selection, plea bargaining trends, the right to counsel and “pay as you go” justice, judicial decisions limiting the availability of class actions, constitutional courts in Europe, the judicial role in creating major social change, and the role lawyers, juries and alternative dispute resolution techniques play in the U.S. and throughout the world. Photos, cartoons, charts, and graphs are used throughout the text to facilitate student learning and highlight key aspects of the judicial process.

the politics of law and courts in society
the politics of law and courts in society

IN SAUDI ARABIA, WOMEN FACE CRIMINAL PENALTIES FOR DRIVING AN AUTOMOBILE.

Moreover, as Middle Eastern journalist Buthaina Al-Nasr explains, “It is not about the driving, it is about control....It is to remind the women that we are controlling you.” Critics of the law charge that ultraconservative males are preventing women from exercising their rights, not only in stopping them from driving but also in pursuing educational and work opportunities. In protest to the ban, Al-Nasr posted a video on CNN showing her driving a car—a risky act of defiance that has been duplicated by scores of other Saudi Arabian women. Such protests have become part of a growing online petition ...

  • Loading...
locked icon

Sign in to access this content

Get a 30 day FREE TRIAL

  • Watch videos from a variety of sources bringing classroom topics to life
  • Read modern, diverse business cases
  • Explore hundreds of books and reference titles