Often the whipping boys of politicians and pundits, lobbyists are the recipients of lampooning stump portrayals and sensationalized news coverage. Little attention is given to how most lobbyists simply do their job or become effective at what they do. Whether it's helping staff draft legislative language, providing members with quality policy and political information, or just being a good listener, lobbyists must build and maintain relationships. If they do, they'll succeed in advancing their policy objectives within the give-and-take process of the American legislative system. The Art of Lobbying examines strategies and techniques from the perspective of those who are lobbied—the people who know what resonates and what falls upon deaf ears in congressional offices. A former longtime lobbyist himself, Levine has interviewed more than 40 current or former members of Congress, along with their staffers, to give a thorough review of the relevant academic literature and offer a behind-the-scenes perspective on what constitutes the art of lobbying.

Red Flags

Red flags

Lobbying is the subject of much myth and even more paranoia. Why shouldn't it be? The potential risks and rewards for stakeholders are high; much of the work of lobbyists is done behind the scenes in private meetings for which there is no public record; many lobbyists and members of Congress have been chummy for ...

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