The Supreme Court Compendium provides historical and statistical information on the Supreme Court: its institutional development; caseload; decision trends; the background, nomination, and voting behavior of its justices; its relationship with public, governmental, and other judicial bodies; and its impact. With over 180 tables and figures, this new edition is intended to capture the full retrospective picture through the 2013-2014 term of the Roberts Court and the momentous decisions handed down within the last four years, including United States v. Windsor, National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius, and Shelby County v. Holder.

The Justices: Oral Arguments, Votes, and Opinions
The Justices: Oral Arguments, Votes, and Opinions

In this chapter we offer an interesting table on oral arguments (Table 6-3). But the primary focus is on the voting behavior and opinion-writing records of the justices of the Supreme Court. This includes liberal versus conservative voting tendencies; voting interagreement among the justices; voting to overturn legislation or precedent; writing the majority, concurring, and dissenting opinions; and joining one or more of the same. The justices must also decide whether to hear cases appealed to them, but the vast majority of their individual votes in such cases are not officially reported and are typically available only from the docket books of the justices. The crucial question here is, Why do ...

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