• Summary
  • Contents
  • Subject index

With its broad spectrum of scholarship on interest groups past and present, Interest Group Politics brings together noted political scientists to provide comprehensive coverage and cutting-edge research on the role and impact of interest groups in U.S. politics, all geared to an undergraduate audience. In the wake of the Citizens United decision and the growth of lobbying into a multi-billion dollar industry, this trusted classic provides students with a guide to the influence and reach of interest groups.

Chapter 13: Interest Groups and America’s “Invisible Governments” : Patterns of Participation and Conflict in Special District Politics

Interest Groups and America’s “Invisible Governments” : Patterns of Participation and Conflict in Special District Politics
Interest Groups and America’s “Invisible Governments”: Patterns of Participation and Conflict in Special District Politics
Anthony J. NownesJosh Cole

Some of the most influential political science studies of the second half of the twentieth century were studies of local government and politics.1 Research interest in local governments, especially big-city governments, continued unabated into the 1960s and early 1970s, as scholars attended to the problems of governing the megalopolis in the age of expanded federal programs, urban unrest, and racial integration.2 Yet by the time Paul Peterson penned the influential City Limits in 1981, political science largely had turned away from local government and politics.3 As the federal government grew, large ...

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