• Summary
  • Contents
  • Subject index

Many actors—from the president and members of Congress to interest groups, NGOs, and the media—compete to shape U.S. foreign policy. The new fifth edition captures this strategic interplay using 15 real-world cases, of which four are brand new: the death of Osama bin Laden and the use of targeted assassinations, nonproliferation policy and the U.S.–India nuclear agreement, the U.S. reaction to Egypt's collision with the Arab Spring, and the surprise asylum request of blind Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng. Fully updated to cover the Obama administration, all cases have been revised to reflect recent developments. Whether grappling with use-of-force questions, the international financial crisis, legal and human rights, trade issues, multilateral approaches to the nuclear programs of North Korea and Iran, or climate change, Carter's engaging ...

The United States and North Korea: Avoiding a Worst-Case Scenario
The United States and North Korea: Avoiding a worst-case scenario
PatrickJames and ÖzgürÖzdamar

Before You Begin

  • Why has North Korea been trying for about three decades to achieve nuclear weapons capability?
  • If incentive-based diplomacy had been pursued initially, would it have had a chance of resolving the issue before North Korea acquired nuclear weapons?
  • Is the Agreed Framework a good arrangement? Is the agreement an example of appeasement or of diplomatic and peaceful management of an international problem?
  • How did President George W. Bush's labeling North Korea a member of the “axis of evil” change U.S.–North Korean relations? How did five years of confrontation policy by the Bush administration contribute to security in East Asia and the world?
  • Was the deal reached ...
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