• Summary
  • Contents
  • Subject index

Many actors—from the president and members of Congress to interest groups, NGOs, and the media—compete to shape U.S. foreign policy. The new fifth edition captures this strategic interplay using 15 real-world cases, of which four are brand new: the death of Osama bin Laden and the use of targeted assassinations, nonproliferation policy and the U.S.–India nuclear agreement, the U.S. reaction to Egypt's collision with the Arab Spring, and the surprise asylum request of blind Chinese dissident Chen Guangcheng. Fully updated to cover the Obama administration, all cases have been revised to reflect recent developments. Whether grappling with use-of-force questions, the international financial crisis, legal and human rights, trade issues, multilateral approaches to the nuclear programs of North Korea and Iran, or climate change, Carter's engaging ...

The International Criminal Court: National Interests Versus International Norms
The International Criminal Court: National interests versus international norms
Donald W.Jackson and Ralph G.Carter

Before You Begin

  • What is the International Criminal Court (ICC), and why do many countries, including principal allies of the US, believe that it is needed?
  • Why was the U.S. position so contrary to positions its allies took?
  • Is there merit to the U.S. position in this case? Have there been any major reasons for us to change the U.S. position? Why or why not?
  • Should advocates of the ICC be concerned that the cases brought to the ICC so far have involved failed or failing states in Africa?
  • Should international law, or the global rule of law, sometimes supersede national interests? If so, when? Why or why not?
  • What ...
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