“As the authors so aptly suggest, good teaching is more a journey than a destination. This book will help both mentors and teachers to navigate this journey successfully.”

Stephen Sroka, Health Education Consultants

Case Western Reserve University

“What a great book to provide for all veteran teachers so that when we are chatting in the lunchroom and ‘new’ teachers share a dilemma, anyone on staff can chime in with advice, backed by research and experience.”

Diane Mierzwik, Teacher and Mentor

Parkview Middle School, Yucaipa, CA

“What Successful Mentors Do is easy to use, linked to best practices and is certain to be an invaluable resource for new and returning mentors.”

Theresa Ford, Developer/Consultant

Educational Testing Service, Downey, CA

Be the best mentor you can be with these state-of-the-art strategies!

The first-day jitters. The first encounter with an angry parent. The first performance review. As a seasoned teacher, you remember each of these “firsts.” But how can you relate your experiences to a new teacher? Find answers to these questions and the research to back them up in this tool-packed guide.

What Successful Mentors Do offers sensible strategies to help mentors help new teachers. Using state-of-the art research as a bas, the authors provide 81 ways to put those “firsts” in perspective for your new teachers. Working from decades of experience, the authors synthesize theory and practice to show mentors how to:

Increase new-teacher retention with the surest methods for classroom success; Encourage teachers in ten essential areas of teaching, from using assessment tools to developing a personal teaching style, and more; Guide teachers in their relationships with colleagues, parents, and administrators; Improve their own mentoring approach and develop a mentoring style; Avoid common mentoring pitfalls

Sometimes life teaches us the lessons we need to grow. Other times, a trusted mentor prepares us for the challenges and guides us to success.

Introduction: The Mentoring Process Is a Journey, Not a Destination

Introduction: The mentoring process is a journey, not a destination

For those who are on the journey of mentor-teaching: There is a calling to share what we have learned (often painfully) to ease the way for those who are just beginning. There is a desire to teach, not just our students, but also those wonderful people who also seek to educate children. It is a noble calling and each of us has come to answer it in a different way.

Cathy Hicks

My own beginning teaching experience was as follows: “Here's the roll book, here's the keys, let me know if you have any trouble,” and the door closed ominously. I don't think I saw the principal again ...

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