NEW TO THIS EDITION: • New topics include the winding down of the Arab uprising, the Supreme Court’s weakening of restrictions on money in politics, and the assortment of new digital technologies. • Increased coverage of global and comparative perspectives; the concept of globalization; social change in less affluent nations; the impact of digital technology; and growing income and wealth inequality. • Additional perspectives from cultural history and political science add to the book’s sociological framework. • Feature boxes, “Topics for Discussion” and “For Future Study” have been have been revised, expanded and updated. KEY FEATURES: • Devotes a chapter to each of the five major drivers of social change: science and technology, social movements, war and revolution, large corporations, and the state. • Shows students how to effectively research social change and gives significant attention to how social science approaches a question and goes about finding answers. • Uses the biography of a fictional character—Iris Summers, a girl who comes of age in post-World War II America—to illustrate the way sweeping changes on a macro scale can effect an individual life. • Immerses readers in stories of great public events, such as a massive dam project on the Colorado River; the transformation of China from communism to authoritarian capitalism; the chipping away of racial injustice through the courts; the adoption of public health care; and the movement to achieve equal rights for women. • The book draws on a wide range of sources to tell the story of social change: academic studies and journal articles, documentary films, literature, newspaper journalism, public polling data, and scientific reports and are portals for further inquiry and exploration. • An instructors’ test bank is available to adopters for readings, quizzes, and in-class exams.

The Personal Experience of Social Change

The Personal Experience of Social Change
The personal experience of social change

If you could use only six words, how would you describe your life? F. Scott Fitzgerald, author of The Great Gatsby, wistfully suggested that he and his wife, Zelda, would write, “For Sale: baby shoes, never worn.” One of my former students, Joe Hampton, penned, “No plan. Hope it works out.” Trying to compose a phrase that captures or summarizes a life is a challenge.1 Life is long (we hope) and full of twists and turns. As the German philosopher Immanuel Kant wrote, “From the crooked timber of humanity, no straight thing can ever be made.” Our plans, sacrifices, character, perseverance, and common sense help take us where we want to go, but ...

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