NEW TO THIS EDITION: • New topics include the winding down of the Arab uprising, the Supreme Court’s weakening of restrictions on money in politics, and the assortment of new digital technologies. • Increased coverage of global and comparative perspectives; the concept of globalization; social change in less affluent nations; the impact of digital technology; and growing income and wealth inequality. • Additional perspectives from cultural history and political science add to the book’s sociological framework. • Feature boxes, “Topics for Discussion” and “For Future Study” have been have been revised, expanded and updated. KEY FEATURES: • Devotes a chapter to each of the five major drivers of social change: science and technology, social movements, war and revolution, large corporations, and the state. • Shows students how to effectively research social change and gives significant attention to how social science approaches a question and goes about finding answers. • Uses the biography of a fictional character—Iris Summers, a girl who comes of age in post-World War II America—to illustrate the way sweeping changes on a macro scale can effect an individual life. • Immerses readers in stories of great public events, such as a massive dam project on the Colorado River; the transformation of China from communism to authoritarian capitalism; the chipping away of racial injustice through the courts; the adoption of public health care; and the movement to achieve equal rights for women. • The book draws on a wide range of sources to tell the story of social change: academic studies and journal articles, documentary films, literature, newspaper journalism, public polling data, and scientific reports and are portals for further inquiry and exploration. • An instructors’ test bank is available to adopters for readings, quizzes, and in-class exams.

Making Social Change: Actively Engaging a Desire for Social Change

Making Social Change: Actively Engaging a Desire for Social Change
Making social change

A favorite word in tech circles is “frictionless.” It captures the pleasures of an app so beautifully designed that using it is intuitive, and it evokes a fantasy in which all inefficiencies, annoyances, and grievances have been smoothed out of existence … to make technology increasingly seamless with real life.

—George Packer (2013: 50)

On a tiny patch of Lower Manhattan, people were camping out to protest Wall Street, decrying its stranglehold on politics and continuing enrichment as the economy flatlined. It was the first Ms. Ward, then a senior, had heard of Occupy Wall Street, and as she learned more about it, her heart glowed. “I’ve been waiting for something to happen for ...

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