Offering a unique and interdisciplinary focus on the roots of violence, Violent Crime: Clinical and Social Implications explores cutting-edge research on the etiology, nature, assessment, and treatment of individuals who commit violent crimes. This edited volume covers the foundations of criminal behavior, offers a balanced discussion of both environmental and biological research, and includes articles written by top researchers and scholars in the field. In Part I, Violent Crime examines the origins of violence, including family and other social factors, media violence, genetics, biochemistry, and head injuries. Part II delves into research on specific subgroups of offenders, including sex offenders, domestic violence perpetrators, murderers, and serial murderers. Part III focuses on issues related to victimology, prevention, and the treatment of violent offenders.

Key Features

Draws from a wide range of disciplines, including criminology, sociology, biology, medical science, genetics, clinical psychology, and psychiatry; Introduces students to cutting-edge research on genetic, biochemical, and traumatic brain injury-related causes and correlates of violent crime; Presents a systematic introduction to the current state of the field (and its likely future) through articles from leading researchers in the various subfields of violent crime; Includes case studies with salient, fascinating examples of actual crimes and criminals to help students understand key points; Offers an international focus, with authors from Canada, England, Greece, and Spain, as well as from the United States; Provides end-of-chapter learning aids, including summaries, discussion questions, Internet resources, and suggestions for further reading

A must-read for any student of criminological research, Violent Crime: Clinical and Social Implications can be used as a core or supplementary text in undergraduate and graduate courses on Violent Crime, Interpersonal Violence, and Social Deviance.

Hate Crimes

Hate crimes
PhyllisB.Gerstenfeld

Weeks later I recall waking up in the hospital with a myriad of emotions, including fear and uncertainty. Most of all, I felt inexplicable humiliation. Not only did I have to face my peers and my family, I had to face the fact that I had been targeted for violence in a brutal crime because of my ethnicity. This crime took place in middle-class America in the year 2006. The reality that hate is alive, strong, and thriving in the cities, towns, and culde-sacs of Suburbia, America was a surprise to me.

DavidRitcheson, hate crime victim (Anti-Defamation League, 2007c)

Case Study: David Ritcheson

David Ritcheson was a 17-year-old Mexican American and had played on his high school football team in a Texas suburb. One evening ...

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