Trust plays a central role in organizational life. It facilitates exchanges among individuals, enhances cooperation and coordination, and contributes to more effective relationships. This volume brings together a cross-disciplinary group of contributors to present some of the latest, most exciting conceptual perspectives in the field and to demonstrate a variety of new methodological approaches to the study of trust. It includes discussions on: the psychological and social antecedents of trust; the effects of social and organizational structures on trust; and the broad effects of trust on organizational functioning.

Chapter 2: Trust in Organizations: A Conceptual Framework Linking Organizational Forms, Managerial Philosophies, and the Opportunity Costs of Controls

Trust in Organizations: A Conceptual Framework Linking Organizational Forms, Managerial Philosophies, and the Opportunity Costs of Controls
Trust in organizations: A conceptual framework linking organizational forms, managerial philosophies, and the opportunity costs of controls
W. E. DouglasCreed, Raymond E.Miles

Interest in the concept of trust has grown throughout the 1980s and into the 1990s. At the societal level, the interest in trust appeared, at least in part, as a “communitarian” response to the self-serving materialism of the Reagan and Bush era (Etzioni, 1988) and as a return to social concern (Bellah, Madsen, Sullivan, Swidler, & Tipton, 1991).

Among organizational scholars, trust has received attention as a mechanism of organizational control and more specifically as an alternative to price and authority (Bradach & Eccles, 1989), as a response to ...

  • Loading...
locked icon

Sign in to access this content

Get a 30 day FREE TRIAL

  • Watch videos from a variety of sources bringing classroom topics to life
  • Read modern, diverse business cases
  • Explore hundreds of books and reference titles