The Practical Guide to Special Educational Needs in Inclusive Primary Classrooms

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Richard Rose & Marie Howley

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    Author Notes

    Richard Rose is Professor of Special and Inclusive Education at the Centre for Special Needs Education and Research, University of Northampton. He previously taught in schools in four English local authorities. Richard is coauthor of several books dealing with special and inclusive schooling, including Strategies to Promote Inclusive Practice and Encouraging Voices: Respecting the Insights of Young People Who Have Been Marginalised.

    Marie Howley is Senior Lecturer in Special Education at the Centre for Special Needs Education and Research, University of Northampton. Her research interests are largely in the area of pupils with autistic spectrum disorders. Marie's previous co-authored books include Accessing the Curriculum for Pupils with Autistic Spectrum Disorders and Revealing the Hidden Code: Social Stories for People with Autistic Spectrum Disorders.

    Acknowledgements

    This book would never have been written without the support of a number of important individuals. Liz Bonnett has provided first-class administrative support throughout. All of our colleagues in the Centre for Special Needs Education and Research (CeSNER) at the University of Northampton, and particularly Liz Waine, have informed our ideas and have been a source of great encouragement. Helen Fairlie at Sage has provided helpful advice throughout the writing and production process. Mayer-Johnson LLC*, and Widgit Software** gave us permission to use illustrations for which they have copyright. Finally, our families have, as ever, inspired and encouraged us. To all of these, we are indebted and say thank you.

    *Mayer-Johnson LLC, PO Box 1579, Solana Beach, CA 92075, USA. Tel: 858 50 0084.

    **Widgit Rebus Symbols © Widgit Software, http://www.Widgit.com. Tel: 01223 425558

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