The Family Communication Sourcebook provides an in-depth examination of contemporary theory and research in the area of family communication. This unique collection offers a state-of-the art approach by pairing conceptual pieces with original studies in the same general topic area. Editors Lynn H. Turner and Richard West present readers with a thoughtful and thorough exploration of the critical issues facing family communication researchers today.

Mulling about Family Conflict and Communication: What we know and what we Need to know

Mulling about Family Conflict and Communication: What we know and what we Need to know

Mulling about family conflict and communication: What we know and what we need to know
Michael E.RoloffNorthwestern University
Courtney WaiteMillerElmhurst College

Jetse Sprey (1969) noted that family can be viewed as a system in conflict consisting of “ongoing confrontation between its members, a confrontation between individuals with conflicting interests in their common situation” (p. 702). There is evidence in support of this observation. Relative to other types of relationships, adults report that they experience the greatest degree of criticism and emotional conflict in their marriage, followed closely by their relationships with siblings, adolescent children, and parents (Argyle & Furnham, 1983). Although diary research indicates that disagreement is most frequent among unhappily married couples, ...

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