• Summary
  • Contents
  • Subject index

‘I found myself questioning my current views on globalization and international competition. In so doing, I have come to a fuller understanding of the dynamics of the process and have enjoyed a unique view into the minds of the decision makers’ - Organization Studies

‘This book is an unusual and valuable addition to the literatures of international business’ - International Business Review

‘The first interesting feature of this study is the selection of industries…. The book provides some valuable insight into the geographic distribution of the world in the mind of the chief executives a matter of interest not only to industry and academia, but also to policy makers…. The classification of international strategies deducted from the interview data is another contribution that book makes…. The book has achieved its main goal of linking theory and practical experience [and] provides interesting reading…. The book translates the logic of the industry world into a nice theory leaving it up to the reader to accept or reject the accompanying business ethics and values’ - Prometheus

‘A highly effective analysis of the changing patterns of competition viewed from an international perspective. There is a plethora of books on globalization and internationalization of industries, but most are long on words and speculation, but short on hard evidence and perspective. Here, the approach of the authors is not to argue that the world is becoming more (or less) global, but to provide a valuable insight into just how these forces are shaping industries, whether managers can influence these forces and what they might mean for those involve’ - Charles Baden-Fuller, City Business School, Series Editor

This book uses in-depth current data from a range of international business, and provides an important new framework for understanding international competitive systems and formulating international business strategy.

Introduction
Introduction

After the discovery of America, Hernan Cortès took back a chocolate drink to Spain. In South America cocoa beans were used as a currency and also to prepare a drink based on cocoa, water, and pepper: it was a stimulant for the Indians. In Spain the cocoa drink was introduced into church celebrations, it had great success as it was supposed not to break the fast. It got to Central Europe in the eighteenth century and arrived in Switzerland. The Swiss had the idea to add milk, and that was it! Chocolate became famous … (Chief Executive Officer, Valor, Spain)

This book, and the study on which it is based, started with the assumption that executives responsible for international activities in their firms have something ...

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