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Gary W. Cordner

In: The Challenge of Community Policing: Testing the Promises

Chapter 10: Foot Patrol without Community Policing: Law and Order in Public Housing

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Foot Patrol without Community Policing: Law and Order in Public Housing
Foot patrol without community policing: Law and order in public housing
Gary W.Cordner

Much of the current enthusiasm for community policing clearly derives from foot patrol studies completed in the early 1980s in Flint, Michigan (Trojanowicz, 1982) and Newark, New Jersey (Police Foundation, 1981), although prior developments in police-community relations, team policing, and crime prevention should not be overlooked (Greene, 1989). The discovery that foot patrol had beneficial effects on fear of crime and citizen satisfaction with police was made on the heels of the first wave of police effectiveness research that had suggested that “nothing worked” (Cordner & Trojanowicz, 1992). Interpretations of the foot patrol findings, including the “broken windows” thesis (Wilson & Kelling, 1982), ...

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