• Summary
  • Contents
  • Subject index

A laser-beam focus on improving instruction to improve learning

Saying “teaching matters most” is easy, and seems obvious. Making it the top priority for school leaders and staff is not so easy—in fact, it's messy. If we want to change how students write, compute, and think, then teachers must change how they teach. They must transform the old “assign-and-assess” model into engaging, compassionate, coherent, and rigorous instruction. The authors show school leaders how to make this happen amidst myriad distractions, initiatives, and interruptions.

Unlike other books that stop at evaluating teachers and instruction, this work demonstrates how to grow schools' instructional capacities with a three-step process that involves: 1. Envisioning what good teaching looks like; 2. Measuring the quality of current instruction against this standard; 3. Working relentlessly to move the quality of instruction closer and closer to the ideal

The authors provide helpful guidance on issues such as hiring, induction, professional development, mentoring, and teacher evaluation. Each chapter offers specific action steps toward building the blueprint for improvement. Also included are frameworks for completing instructional audits in schools, and probes, instruments, and protocols for measuring and tracking the quality of instruction. Leaders will find excellent guidance for spearheading and sustaining a focused and aligned effort to improve the quality of teaching to impact all learners.

How Do We Learn About the Quality of Our Teaching?
How do we learn about the quality of our teaching?

In the previous chapters, we make the case that the obvious and too often neglected route to school improvement and gains in student learning and achievement should come by way of advances in the quality of teaching across a school. Our hope lies with the teachers. While this might seem common sense to many educators and noneducators alike, we can appreciate that a principal who envisions the goal of improved quality in teaching across a school might feel like she is speaking a foreign language when proposing to a superintendent and to a school board a comprehensive plan for improving the quality of instruction. Someone might ...

  • Loading...
locked icon

Sign in to access this content

Get a 30 day FREE TRIAL

  • Watch videos from a variety of sources bringing classroom topics to life
  • Read modern, diverse business cases
  • Explore hundreds of books and reference titles