Teaching Mathematics in Grades 6 − 12: Developing Research-Based Instructional Practices will provide prospective teachers mathematics in grades 6 − 12 with guidance on what to cover in secondary mathematics courses and how to cover those topics. The text is based on the premise that engaging prospective teachers in the study of students’ mathematical thinking is a powerful and under-utilized strategy for secondary teacher education. The six chapters in Part I of the text provides an induction to the field of mathematics education. The five chapters in Part II describe how students think about mathematical concepts. Borrowing an organizational strategy from the Common Core State Standards, standards documents of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, and standards documents of many states, each of chapters in this part is devoted to a specific mathematics content strand.

Implementing and Assessing Mathematics Lessons and Curricula

Implementing and assessing mathematics lessons and curricula

Written lessons and curriculum materials do not implement themselves. Because individual teachers bring their own interpretations to bear, the manner in which a written curriculum or lesson is implemented inevitably varies from classroom to classroom. To emphasize this point, Stein, Remillard, and Smith (2007) distinguished the written curriculum from the intended curriculum and the enacted curriculum. The written curriculum is that which exists in print on the pages of textbooks and curriculum materials. The intended curriculum refers to a teacher's instructional plans related to a given curriculum. The enacted curriculum is that which actually unfolds in the teacher's classroom setting. There is seldom a seamless transition from the written to the ...

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