• Summary
  • Contents
  • Subject index

Rob Long’s Intervention Toolbox is written for education practitioners who support young people with problem behaviours that act as barriers to their successful engagement with school. Taking a multi-dimensional approach, the Toolbox provides solutions to deal with the multi-faceted nature of challenging behaviour. There are 6 compartments to the Toolbox: Physiological; Feelings; Behaviour; Cognitive; Social; Happiness. For each compartment there are a number of tools (interventions) that may be used depending on the age and level of understanding of the young person. As all problem behaviours have many component parts, the Toolbox enables practitioners to employ several interventions to comprehensively tackle challenging behaviours. There are specific sections on both Asperger’s Syndrome and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorders with In Class Behaviour Plans for these learners, as well as an accompanying CD Rom including resources for putting strategies into practice. The CD Rom also provides PowerPoint slides for training staff in using the Toolbox. As an experienced professional, teacher and educational psychologist, Rob Long’s strategies combine innovation with sound psychology and learning theories.

Children and Young People in School
Children and young people in school

A growing amount of evidence highlights the rise in the incidence of childhood disorders:

it is estimated that at least 10% of the school population in England is, at any one time, affected with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties …, it is important to note that the overwhelming majority are to be found in mainstream schools. (Cooper, 2005)

There is an increase in ‘acting out’ disorders (behaviour/conduct disorders), as well as the ‘acting in’ emotional, mental health disorders (eating disorders, anxiety, depression, self-injury). Haggerty et al. (1996) spoke of ‘many troubled families who share a multitude of risk factors’, including genetic, biological and psychosocial factors, and that children suffer from these cumulative effects.

Whatever the explanation for ...

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