George Ritzer's McDonaldization thesis argued that contemporary life is succumbing to the standardization, flexibility and practicability of fast-food service. This book brings together specially commissioned papers by leading social and cultural analysts to engage in a critical appraisal of the thesis. The contributors discuss the roots of the thesis, the rationalization of late modern life, the effects of increasing cultural commodification, the continuing prominence of American cultural and economic imperialism and the impact of globalization on social and cultural life. The strengths and weaknesses of the McDonaldization thesis are clearly evaluated and the irrational consequences of rationalization are pinpointed and critically

Golden Arches and Iron Cages: McDonaldization and the Poverty of Cultural Pessimism at the End of the Twentieth Century

Golden Arches and Iron Cages: McDonaldization and the Poverty of Cultural Pessimism at the End of the Twentieth Century

Golden arches and iron cages: McDonaldization and the poverty of cultural pessimism at the end of the twentieth century
ChristianeBenderGianfrancoPoggi

Let it never be said again that sociology is an abstraction-mad discipline, incapable of capturing cognitively the lived reality of everyday experience! For lately George Ritzer has proven the contrary, by dealing with an everyday phenomenon, in evidence in nearly all major and many minor locales in Western countries and elsewhere, and for that very reason, paradoxically, not often subject to sustained observation – the fast-food restaurant. Since reading Ritzer's book, we have found ourselves watching our respective neighbourhood's McDonald's with keen interest; and we have occasionally allowed ...

  • Loading...
locked icon

Sign in to access this content

Get a 30 day FREE TRIAL

  • Watch videos from a variety of sources bringing classroom topics to life
  • Read modern, diverse business cases
  • Explore hundreds of books and reference titles