• Summary
  • Contents
  • Subject index

Opening Acts: Performance in/as Communication and Cultural Criticism offers new, rigorous ways to analyze communication and culture through performance. Editor Judith Hamera, along with a distinguished list of contributors, provides students with cutting-edge readings of everyday life, space, history, and intersections of all three, using a critical performance-based approach. This text makes three significant contributions to the field - it familiarizes readers with the core elements and commitments of performance-based analysis, links performance-based analysis to theoretical and analytical perspectives in communication and cultural studies, and provides engaging examples of how to use performance as a critical tool to open up communication and culture.offers new, rigorous ways to analyze communication and culture through performance. Editor Judith Hamera, along with a distinguished list of contributors, provides students with cutting-edge readings of everyday life, space, history, and intersections of all three, using a critical performance-based approach. This text makes three significant contributions to the field - it familiarizes readers with the core elements and commitments of performance-based analysis, links performance-based analysis to theoretical and analytical perspectives in communication and cultural studies, and provides engaging examples of how to use performance as a critical tool to open up communication and culture.

Introduction
Introduction
JudithHamera

In “Making History Go” (1998), the introduction to her volume Exceptional Spaces: Essays in Performance and History, Della Pollock poses a series of questions that lie at the heart of history's “crisis in representation”:

What does it mean to represent the past? How have politics shaped the traditions of representation? What are the appropriate objects of historical analysis (whether from the prospective of the art, literary, or social historian)? Who are the subjects of history—and are they agents or subjects only? How can the representational tactics of scholars across the disciplines restore and enable historical agency? To what extent is history writing itself an exercise in history making? (pp. 3–4)

These questions vex all critical historians, but, on the surface, they would appear especially challenging for ...

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