• Summary
  • Contents
  • Subject index

Opening Acts: Performance in/as Communication and Cultural Criticism offers new, rigorous ways to analyze communication and culture through performance. Editor Judith Hamera, along with a distinguished list of contributors, provides students with cutting-edge readings of everyday life, space, history, and intersections of all three, using a critical performance-based approach. This text makes three significant contributions to the field - it familiarizes readers with the core elements and commitments of performance-based analysis, links performance-based analysis to theoretical and analytical perspectives in communication and cultural studies, and provides engaging examples of how to use performance as a critical tool to open up communication and culture.offers new, rigorous ways to analyze communication and culture through performance. Editor Judith Hamera, along with a distinguished list of contributors, provides students with cutting-edge readings of everyday life, space, history, and intersections of all three, using a critical performance-based approach. This text makes three significant contributions to the field - it familiarizes readers with the core elements and commitments of performance-based analysis, links performance-based analysis to theoretical and analytical perspectives in communication and cultural studies, and provides engaging examples of how to use performance as a critical tool to open up communication and culture.

Introduction
Introduction
JudithHamera

Scholars choose performance-based approaches to critical analysis for many reasons, among them:

  • The challenges of engaging culture as an embodied process, not a thing, text, or a set of variables.
  • The rigors of working across, betwixt and between conceptual categories like space and place, here/now and there/then, archive and repertoire, production and consumption.
  • The metatheoretical and methodological opportunities to reflect on and change how dimensions of difference, location, history, and daily practice are represented in academic discourse.

But, truth be told, they also do so for another reason, one they might confess to a colleague over a meal at a conference, or offer in a bracing moment of self-disclosure to a special student or an extraordinary class. They might share this with the shame of an apostate or ...

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