Mood Management Leader's Manual: A Cognitive-Behavioral Skills-Building Program for Adolescents

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Carol A. Langelier

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  • Front Matter
  • Back Matter
  • Copyright

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    Clip Art

    All clip art used in this workbook was obtained from the following sources:

    • Corel Graphics Pack 1995 Corel Corporation
    • Microsoft Publisher 97 CD Deluxe Microsoft Corporation

    Dedication

    To my family, friends, and mentors for their support, wisdom, and belief in emotional wellness.

    How to Use the Skills Workbook

    About Mood Management
    • Description

      Mood Management is a skills-building program designed to help adolescents learn to effectively manage difficult emotions such as anger, depression, anxiety, and low self-esteem. On the basis of cognitive behavioral counseling theory, Mood Management emphasizes the importance of developing useful strategies that empower adolescents to make responsible behavioral choices in answer to the challenging emotions they experience.

      Often overwhelmed by life's demands, teenagers frequently lack the skills required to effectively maneuver the emotional challenges of adolescence. Mood Management, aptly described as a journey toward emotional wellness, is a program that requires adolescents to learn and practice a set of skills that equip them with the ability to respond to these challenges and accompanying emotions in a healthy manner. Rather than feeling “controlled by” their emotions, adolescents who learn and practice Mood Management skills are enabled to “take control” to effectively manage difficult emotions and corresponding behaviors.

      Mood Management encourages adolescents to take responsibility for their emotional well-being. It stresses the importance of practicing the skills introduced in each unit of the Skills Workbook to achieve and maintain emotional wellness. Through the use of cognitive behavioral strategies, adolescents learn to challenge self-defeating thoughts that keep them “stuck” in difficult emotions such as anger, depression, anxiety, and low self-esteem.

    • Classroom Guidance, Group Counseling, and Individual Therapy

      Mood Management can be used in schools as the curriculum in a classroom guidance program or group counseling program. In addition, it can serve as a tool used by clinicians working with adolescents in brief, individual therapy or group therapy in both outpatient and inpatient settings. Although the Skills Workbook is primarily written from the perspective of a classroom guidance or group counseling program, clinicians can easily adapt the information in the Skills Workbook to facilitate individual therapy.

    • The Setting

      Mood Management can be used in many different settings, including schools, inpatient/outpatient treatment facilities, private practice, and community service agencies. School counselors, teachers, psychologists, social workers, and other mental health practitioners who desire to move adolescents toward emotional wellness by emphasizing cognitive behavioral strategies will find Mood Management to be a valuable tool in their work with adolescents.

    • Length of the Mood Management Program

      The number of sessions required to complete the Mood Management Program will vary depending on many different factors such as time allotted per session, format (classroom guidance, group counseling, and individual counseling/therapy), general discussion during each session, etc. The Mood Management Program can generally be completed in 8 to 12 sessions. Adolescents often request to repeat the program and are encouraged to do so to reinforce the skills they learned when taking the program for the first time.

    Getting Started
    • Design

      Each unit in the Skills Workbook is designed to introduce adolescents to various Mood Management techniques using a format that is both didactic and experiential in nature. Beginning with the Introduction on page 1, the Skills Workbook provides easy-to-follow guidelines for structuring a classroom guidance program as well as group or individual counseling sessions.

    • The Basics

      The format of each unit in the Skills Workbook follows a specific sequence as follows:

      • Reading
      • Discussion Questions
      • Skill Session
      • Weekly Assignment
      • Before We Move On - Review & Preview

    Each of these sections is easily recognized in the Skills Workbook by a special logo. Beginning with Unit 2, the Before We Move On - Review & Preview section is used as the starting point for introducing each new unit in the Skills Workbook.

    The Table of Contents serves as a handy outline, set off section by section, for the user to follow.

    • Overhead Transparencies

      The presentation of didactic information is aided through the use of overhead transparencies. The user should refer to the List of Transparencies on page xii to determine when each transparency should be introduced and used in the Skills Workbook. The Guide to Transparencies provides a visual reference to each transparency. Transparency masters, found in Appendix D, are printed on perforated paper so the user can remove them to make overhead transparencies.

    Acknowledgments

    The creation of the Mood Management Skills Workbook as well as the program for which it was designed could not have been accomplished without the support and cooperation of many people. I express my gratitude to my colleagues for their continued and enthusiastic support of the Mood Management Program. I am truly fortunate to work with these talented individuals. Their effort to move adolescents toward emotional wellness by encouraging participation in the Mood Management Program is sincerely appreciated.

    I extend a special thanks to the counselors who have worked as coleaders in the Mood Management Program. Their insightful and skilled comments during group sessions as well as their willingness to share ideas for revisions of the Skills Workbook have played a key role in the success of the Mood Management Program. It is with the deepest respect that I thank Carolyn Arndt, Sandra Belair, John Chappell, Sheila Evjy, Maureen McGill, and Brenda Poznanski for their invaluable assistance in this endeavor.

    I also thank those who have strongly supported and encouraged the use of the Mood Management Program in their schools. Sincere appreciation is extended to Nancy Duffy, Dr. P. Alan Pardy, Deborah Sadowski, and Robert Scully for their enthusiastic support of the Mood Management Program.

    Lastly, I thank the adolescents who have participated in this program. Their desire to move toward emotional wellness by learning the skills promoted in this program is a process that deserves our utmost respect. I am truly honored that they have been willing to allow me to take part in their journey.

    The greater part of our happiness or misery depends on our dispositions and not on our circumstances. We carry the seeds of one or the other about with us in our minds wherever we go.

    Martha Washington
  • Appendix A: Challenging Maps

    Challenging Map - Side A

    Challenging Map - Side B

    Challenging Map - Side A

    Challenging Map - Side B

    Challenging Map - Side A

    Challenging Map - Side B

    Challenging Map - Side A

    Challenging Map - Side B

    Challenging Map - Side A

    Challenging Map - Side B

    Challenging Map - Side A

    Challenging Map - Side B

    Challenging Map - Side A

    Challenging Map - Side B

    Challenging Map - Side A

    Challenging Map - Side B

    Challenging Map Sides A & B

    Appendix B: Action Plans

    My Action Plan

    The emotion(s) that has caused me difficulty is:____

    This emotion has stopped me from:____

    The small goal I would like to achieve is:____

    My Action Plan

    The emotion(s) that has caused me difficulty is:____

    This emotion has stopped me from:____

    The small goal I would like to achieve is:____

    My Action Plan

    The emotion(s) that has caused me difficulty is:____

    This emotion has stopped me from:____

    The small goal I would like to achieve is:____

    My Action Plan

    The emotion(s) that has caused me difficulty is:____

    This emotion has stopped me from:____

    The small goal I would like to achieve is:____

    My Action Plan

    The emotion(s) that has caused me difficulty is:____

    This emotion has stopped me from:____

    The small goal I would like to achieve is:____

    My Action Plan

    The emotion(s) that has caused me difficulty is:____

    This emotion has stopped me from:____

    The small goal I would like to achieve is:____

    My Action Plan

    The emotion(s) that has caused me difficulty is:____

    This emotion has stopped me from:____

    The small goal I would like to achieve is:____

    My Action Plan

    The emotion(s) that has caused me difficulty is:____

    This emotion has stopped me from:____

    The small goal I would like to achieve is:____

    My Action Plan

    The emotion(s) that has caused me difficulty is:____

    This emotion has stopped me from:____

    The small goal I would like to achieve is:____

    Appendix C: Thought Records

    Mood Management Thought Record

    Mood Management Thought Record

    Mood Management Thought Record

    Mood Management Thought Record

    Mood Management Thought Record

    Mood Management Thought Record

    Mood Management Thought Record

    Mood Management Thought Record

    Mood Management Thought Record

    Appendix D: Transparency Masters

    The 3 Yes Rule
    • Do my goals involve changing myself rather than expecting others to change?
    • Do my goals involve changing things that are within my control?
    • Are my goals realistic?
    It's all about Image
    • I do care.
    • Managing problems effectively is a plus.
    • Awareness is important.
    • Go for it - it's worth the effort!
    • Emotions - we all have them and can learn to deal with them effectively.
    Making General Goals More Specific
    • What would be different if I were approaching the goals I set in Unit 1?
    • What changes would I see?
    • What smaller steps are necessary in order to achieve my initial goal?
    • What is giving me trouble now?
    • How will I know when I'm doing better - what will happen?

    Emotional Traffic Jams: The Five Roads

    Wellness Mind — Emotional Mind

    It's the Thought That Counts!

    Thoughts, Feelings, & Behaviors

    Negative Emotional Cycles

    The Cycle of Depression

    The Cycle of Anger

    The Cycle of Anxiety

    The Cycle of Low Self-Esteem

    Characteristics of the Emotional Mind
    • It generates automatic, self-defeating thoughts.
    • It wants you to believe negative things about yourself, your future, and your world.
    • It's fast and furious. 0 to 60 in 8.2 seconds.
    • It likes to trick you.
    • It uses key words such as “never,” “should,” “always,” “if/then,” and “everything.”
    • It keeps you stuck in your negative emotional cycle.
    • It often gives you the same interpretation of different triggers that, over time, causes core beliefs to develop.

    Challenging: Be Your Own Mood Police

    Challenging: Take a Detour from Your Emotional Mind

    Challenging Map: The Route to the Wellness Mind

    The Thought Record

    My Action Plan…
    The emotion(s) that has caused me difficulty is:anger
    This emotion has stopped me from:getting along with others
    The small goal I would like to achieve is:getting along with one person
    Goal(s)Specific Steps to takeEvaluate Results
    Get along better with my boyfriend/girlfriend.
    • Listen carefully to what he/she says.
    • Buy him/her a card just because.
    • When I feel angry, count to 10 before saying anything.
    • When I feel angry, tell him/her that I need a time-out.
    • When I feel angry, fill out a Challenging Map.
    • No problems.
    • He/she was surprised.
    • I had to count to 30.

    About the Author

    Carol A. Langelier, PhD, is a licensed psychologist and member of the adjunct faculty at Rivier College, where she teaches courses in the Graduate Counseling and School Psychology programs. She is employed as a school psychologist in New Hampshire. Her experience working with adolescents is extensive. She has been employed in clinical inpatient and outpatient settings as well as schools during her career as a teacher, counselor, and psychologist. She is a member of the American Psychological Association, the American Counseling Association, and the National Association of School Psychologists. Her interests include multicultural counseling. She has authored and coauthored articles in this area and has presented at national conferences on multicultural identity development. She also works as a diversity trainer, providing workshops to schools on the cultural context of education.

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