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In 2014, the ethics and politics of hospitality were brought into stark relief. Three years into the Syrian conflict, which had already created nearly 2.5 million refugees and internally displaced 6.5 million, the UN called on industrialised countries to share the burden of offering hospitality through a fixed quota system. The UK opted out of the system whilst hailing their acceptance of a moral responsibility by welcoming only 500 of the ‘most vulnerable’ Syrians. Given the state’s exclusionary character, what opportunities do other spaces in international politics offer by way of hospitality to migrants and refugees? Hospitality can take many different forms and have many diverse purposes. But wherever it occurs, the boundaries that enable it and make it possible are both created and unsettled ...

Genocidal Hospitality: Homes, Hotels and Homelands
Genocidal Hospitality: Homes, Hotels and Homelands

Whilst it is important to stress the quotidian nature of hospitality as an ethical practice, this does not limit it to the banal and mundane. In fact, when faced with perhaps the most appalling emergency, hospitality often appears the obvious ethical action on an interpersonal level. Perhaps the best-known tales from the Holocaust, those of Anne Frank and Oscar Schindler, are based in acts of hospitality which at least temporarily saved lives. The salvational potential of hospitality thus appears obvious. Because of the nature of the horrific acts that make up genocide, crimes against humanity and ethnic cleansing (from enforced displacement to mass murder and rape), and the way they target a specific ...

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