• Summary
  • Contents
  • Subject index

“Establishing school-family-community partnerships to promote the social, emotional, and academic learning of students is the most important challenge for 21st-century education. In this volume, leading practitioners and researchers compellingly convey the rationale and inspiration for these partnerships. They also share many practical, innovative, and effective strategies that readers can readily implement to engage partners in raising knowledgeable, responsible, caring, and contributing children.”

—Roger P. Weissberg, Liberal Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor University of Illinois at Chicago

Making schooling a community endeavor!

Because schools are the heart and soul of a community, educational leaders have a responsibility to bring the community into the school, as well as to make the school a part of the surrounding community. This volume in the Soul of Educational Leadership series goes beyond administrative skills to examine educators' pivotal role of leading family and community involvement in school success.

With articles written by leading authorities and practitioners in the field, this resource discusses how school leaders can build successful family and community partnerships that flourish even in trying circumstances and over time. Readers will find:

Contributions from Alan M. Blankstein, Pedro A. Noguera, Mavis G. Sanders, Paul D. Houston, Edward H. Moore, and others; Inspiring and unique perspectives on the interplay of family and community in school success; Ideas for engaging families as partners.

Raising the Village by Bringing Communities and Schools Together
Raising the village by bringing communities and schools together
PaulD.Houston

I first met Bill Milliken, the founder of Communities in Schools, at a lunch that had been arranged for us by someone who thought we might be kindred spirits. Bill talked about the need to find ways to get communities engaged with schools, because the social safety net that kids need had become unraveled and schools were being asked to serve as father, mother, nurse, social worker, and priest to the children in their care.

As we ate lunch, and Bill shared with me his passionate feelings about this important topic, I told him he had come to the right place, because I thought we needed to get schools ...

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