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Patricia Benner

In: Interpretive Phenomenology: Embodiment, Caring, and Ethics in Health and Illness

Chapter 6: The Tradition and Skill of Interpretive Phenomenology in Studying Health, Illness, and Caring Practices

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The Tradition and Skill of Interpretive Phenomenology in Studying Health, Illness, and Caring Practices
The tradition and skill of interpretive phenomenology in studying health, illness, and caring practices
PatriciaBenner

The phenomenon and its context frame the interpretive project of understanding the world of participants or events. The interpretive researcher creates a dialogue between practical concerns and lived experience through engaged reasoning and imaginative dwelling in the immediacy of the participants' worlds. The goal is to study the phenomenon in its own terms (Husserl, 1964), and this requires being critically reflective on the ways that any one set of prescribed methodological strategies, personal knowledge, and social context create a theoretical and perceptual access that influences understanding. Interpretive phenomenology involves a rigorous scholarly reading of texts—questioning, comparing, and imaginatively ...

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