Previous Chapter Chapter 15: Narrative Methodology in Disaster Studies: Rescuers of Cypress

Cynthia M. Stuhlmiller

In: Interpretive Phenomenology: Embodiment, Caring, and Ethics in Health and Illness

Chapter 15: Narrative Methodology in Disaster Studies: Rescuers of Cypress

  • Citations
  • Add to My List
  • Text Size

Narrative Methodology in Disaster Studies: Rescuers of Cypress
Narrative methodology in disaster studies: Rescuers of Cypress
Cynthia M.Stuhlmiller

Researchers agree that natural and human-created disasters have a strong psychological impact on individuals, communities, and those who become involved in helping in disaster recovery. They disagree, however, about the nature, extent, and consequences of these events. Traditionally, two competing positions have guided inquiry and conclusions in this area. Most researchers believe that disasters create adverse psychological reactions both immediately after the impact and for a long period—perhaps for the individual's entire life span. The less popular position holds that although some individuals experience adverse reactions, research has greatly overstated the extent of those negative consequences and has overlooked some positive outcomes: the enhanced coping abilities with which many ...

Looks like you do not have access to this content.

Login

Don’t know how to login?

Click here for free trial login.

Back to Top

Copy and paste the following HTML into your website