“Howes' new textbook, Human Memory, offers a thorough and expansive introduction to the science of remembering and forgetting. With highly accessible prose, Howes keeps the student clearly in mind as she deftly weaves together traditional and novel approaches to memory research. Unlike any other memory textbook on the market… it looks to be a definite winner in the classroom.”

—James S. Nairne, Purdue University

Presented in a clear and accessible format, Human Memory: Structures and Images offers students a comprehensive overview of research in human memory. Providing a theoretical background for the research, author Mary B. Howes covers three major areas—mainstream experimental research; naturalistic research; and work in the domains of the amnesias, malfunctions of memory, and neuroscience.

Key Features:

Presents extensive coverage of naturalistic research: Areas of current naturalistic research, such as eyewitness testimony and courtroom procedures, are included, as are the functioning of memory under atypical or abnormal conditions and traumatic and repressed memories.; Emphasizes the constructivist position: Offering greater coverage than other books on this model of memory, this text also examines the debate between constructivist and nonconstructivist theories.; Offers two chapters online on computers and memory:Chapter 1 on computer functioning simulation of memory and Chapter 2 on computer models of long-term memory are easily accessed online. See Human Memory in our online catalog at http://www.sagepub.com and click on “Sample Materials” to view these chapters.; Supplies instructors with thoughtfully crafted support material: An Instructor's Resources CD-ROM, including PowerPoint slides, study quizzes, test items, and worksheets, is available to all qualified adopters.

Intended Audience:

This text is designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate courses such as Memory, Human Memory, Memory and Cognition, and Memory and Forgetting.

Memory for Images

Memory for images

Overview

  • Human recognition of images (scenes, etc.) is strong. However, it appears that this high level of recognition is achieved on the basis of identifying the general contours of the scene or picture, and that it does not include identifying more trivial detail. Human recall of detail therefore tends to be weak and, often, changed from the original image.
  • At one time, there was a controversy concerning whether images were coded as propositional descriptions or in the form of a direct, analog image code. The latter view has generally prevailed.
  • In support of the analog view, it appears that when geometric images are rotated mentally, the rotation takes longer when the corresponding object would have to be moved for a ...
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