In this volume, international contributors discuss the philosophical basis and history of harm reduction policies and examine their outcomes. They also cover controversial topics related to harm reduction especially conflicts between the public health system, where most programs are located, and a worldwide criminal justice system that further marginalizes drug users. The book describes programs from the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Brazil, The Netherlands, Switzerland and Australia.

Chapter 6: Coffee Shops, Low-Threshold Methadone, and Needle Exchange: Controlling Illicit Drug Use in the Netherlands

Coffee Shops, Low-Threshold Methadone, and Needle Exchange: Controlling Illicit Drug Use in the Netherlands

Coffee shops, low-threshold methadone, and needle exchange: Controlling illicit drug use in the Netherlands
Dirk J.KorfErnst C.Buning

Harm Reduction as a Mainstream Concept

The first automobiles attracted many enthusiastic spectators, but car accidents soon led to protests. To reduce hazardous effects to motorists and others, safer cars were constructed. New measures were introduced to increase public safety: traffic lights, viaducts, speed limits, mandatory regular check-ups, safety belts, and so on. Recently, environmental awareness generated new protests against cars. In response, companies and state authorities put more emphasis on pollution-reducing measures, such as cars that run more economically, unleaded gasoline and catalytic converters, and even cars with electric motors.

Although mass media campaigns bombard us with ...

  • Loading...
locked icon

Sign in to access this content

Get a 30 day FREE TRIAL

  • Watch videos from a variety of sources bringing classroom topics to life
  • Read modern, diverse business cases
  • Explore hundreds of books and reference titles