• Summary
  • Contents
  • Subject index

The concept of `governance' has become a central catchword across the social and political sciences. In Governing and Governance, Jan Kooiman revisits and develops his seminal work in the field to map and demonstrate the utility of a sociopolitical perspective to our understanding of contemporary forms of governing, governance and governability. A central underlying theme of the book is the notion of governance as a process of interaction between different societal and political actors and the growing interdependencies between the two as modern societies become ever more complex, dynamic and diverse. Drawing upon a wide range of interdisciplinary insights, the book advances a comprehensive conceptual framework that seeks to capture the different elements, modes and orders of governing and governance. A series of useful distinctions ...

Hierarchical Governance
Hierarchical governance

If from the exposition on modes of governance so far, it might have appeared as if governing has basically changed, this impression is (probably) wrong. The rationalised, bureaucratic or hierarchical state so well described and modelled by Max Weber, is still around us, and very much alive. At its margins – and maybe even at the centre here and there – cracks are appearing and critical voices about its performance are becoming more vocal. Whether the state is ‘withering away’, ‘hollowing out’, Entzaubert (‘lost its magic’) or even La fin de l'Etat? (‘ended’), as some observers advance, remains more a point of view than anything else. The hierarchical model of societal governance may have lost some of its classical glory, but in ...

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