We experience violence all our lives, from that very first scream of birth. It has been industrialized and domesticated. Our culture has not become accustomed to all violence, to be sure; but enough violence, nonetheless: more than enough, perhaps. Geographies of Violence is a critical human geography of the history of violence, from Ancient Rome and Enlightened wars through to natural disasters, animal slaughter, and genocide. Written incredible insight and flair, this is a thought-provoking text for human geography students and researchers alike.

Pre-industrial Mass Killing The Gift of Death from Ancient Rome to the Aztec Empire

Pre-industrial Mass Killing The Gift of Death from Ancient Rome to the Aztec Empire

Pre-industrial Mass Killing: The Gift of Death from Ancient Rome to the Aztec Empire

Every people, the proverb has it, loves its own form of violence.

Clifford Geertz, 2005: 84

In The Cunning of History, Richard Rubenstein (2001: 7) mentions how ‘twentieth-century mass slaughter began in earnest with World War I. About 6,000 people were killed every day for over 1,500 days.’ Martin Gilbert (1995: 541) adds that while ‘20,000 British soldiers were killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme is often recalled with horror … a similar number of soldiers were killed in every four-day period of the First World War’. What I find chilling about this slaughter ...

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