Art and science both hinge on discovery, and discovery requires thinking out of the box. But how do you lead students to think creatively in STEM education? The answer is STEAM, and A is for the arts. STEAM—the integration of music, visual arts, and drama into daily STEM instruction—is proven to enhance student achievement in STEM subjects. After all, creative, real-world problem-solving is what working scientists and mathematicians actually do. But how do busy STEM educators weave arts activities into a sometimes inflexible STEM curriculum? In this new edition of From STEM to STEAM, the ground-breaking bestseller, the authors provide lessons from the field to detail the way. Authors David Sousa, expert in educational neuroscience, and Tom Pilecki, veteran arts educator, pool theircombined eighty years of expertise to deliver: • Research studies in cognitive and social neuroscience, including new findings on how technology is rewiring students’ brains, that demonstrate how arts activities enhance creativity, problem solving, memory systems, motor coordination, and analytical skills—all critical elements to achieving STEM objectives. • Classroom-tested strategies and techniques for integrating the arts into STEM instruction, including sample K-12 lessons plans and planning templates. • Tools for building a professional development program designed to helps arts and STEM teachers collaborate to create STEAM lessons. • Sample planning frameworks that provide a smooth transition from STEM to STEAM, including advice on adapting STEAM to meet the individual needs and limitations of a school or district. • A list of resources available to teachers in the STEM subjects, in the arts, in arts integration, and for STEAM. The main objective of both art and science is discovery. Lead your students to make that connection and STEAM ahead to academic success!

Implementing Arts Integration in the Intermediate Grades (5–8)

Implementing Arts Integration in the Intermediate Grades (5–8)

The mass media heap out unrelenting doses of prefabricated images to children. . . . As a result, kids simply sit back and passively drink in these images, which then proceed to seep into the subconscious only to emerge in school as stereotypical drawings, stories filled with clichés, and artificial and unreal conceptions of how the world works.

—Thomas Armstrong, from Awakening Genius in the Classroom (1998)

During these preadolescent years, brain growth and development continue at a remarkable pace. Growth and development may seem the same, but biologist Robert Sylwester (2010) makes a clear distinction between them. He suggests that growth implies an increase in some existing condition, ...

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