From Staff Room to Classroom: A Guide for Planning and Coaching Professional Development

Books

Robin J. Fogarty & Brian M. Pete

  • Citations
  • Add to My List
  • Text Size

  • Chapters
  • Front Matter
  • Back Matter
  • Subject Index
  • Copyright

    Acknowledgments

    The art and science of teaching adults is no easy endeavor!

    We treasure the legacy of the researchers and writers who have informed our practice. Accolades to the work of Knowles, Zemke and Zemke, Fullan, Guskey, and Joyce and Showers.

    We cherish the professional learning community of learned colleagues who have developed this work with us: Many thanks for the rich experiences with Jim Bellanca, Kay Burke, R. Bruce Williams, Valerie Gregory, Sue Marcus, Carolyn Chapman, Gayle Gregory, Terry Parry, David Kinney, Cathy Sambo, and Elaine and David Brownlow.

    We celebrate the true technicians who have worked to make this production possible. We appreciate the talent and toil of Jean Ward, Robert Holm, Connie Collins, Donna Ramirez, Sandra Morris, Dara Lee Howard, and Tim Fogarty.

    Publisher’s Acknowledgments

    Corwin Press gratefully acknowledges the contributions of the following reviewers:

    • Catherine Hill
      • Director of Staff and Organizational Development
      • Douglas County School District
      • Castle Rock, CO
    • Dr. Terri Patterson
      • Director of Professional Development
      • Waco Independent School District
      • Waco, TX

    About the Authors

    Robin J. Fogarty is president of RFA, Robin Fogarty & Associates, a Chicago-based, minority-owned educational publishing/consulting company. A leading proponent of the thoughtful classroom, Robin has trained educators throughout the world in curriculum, instruction, and assessment strategies. She has taught at all levels, from kindergarten to college, served as an administrator, and consulted with state departments and ministries of education in the United States, Puerto Rico, Russia, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Germany, Great Britain, Singapore, South Korea, the Netherlands, the Kingdom of Bahrain, Dubai, Abu Dhabi, and Saudi Arabia. Robin has published articles in Educational Leadership, Phi Delta Kappan, the Journal of Staff Development, and the Middle School Journal. She is the author of numerous publications, including Brain-Compatible Classrooms, Literacy Matters: Strategies Every Teacher Can Use, Ten Things New Teachers Need to Succeed, How to Integrate the Curricula, The Adult Learner, A Look at Transfer, Close the Achievement Gap, Twelve Brain Principles That Make the Difference, Nine Best Practices That Make the Difference, From Staff Room to Classroom: A Guide for Planning and Coaching Professional Development, How to Teach Thinking Skills Within the Common Core: 7 Key Student Proficiencies of the New National Standards, and Invite! Excite! Ignite! 13 Principles for Teaching, Learning and Leading, K–12. Robin received her bachelor of arts in early childhood education at SUNY, Potsdam, NY, and her master’s in instructional strategies from National Louis University in Evanston, IL. Her doctorate is from Loyola University of Chicago in curriculum and human resource development. She is known as the teacher’s teacher and has mentored numerous colleagues in the art and science of working with the adult learner. She brings a wealth of knowledge and passion to all endeavors, has a wealth of knowledge in the field, and conducts highly interactive professional development sessions.

    Brian M. Pete, co-founder of Robin Fogarty & Associates, comes from a family of educators: college professors, school superintendents, teachers, and teachers of teachers. He has a rich background in professional development. Brian has worked with the adult learner in districts and educational agencies throughout the United States, Europe, Asia, Australia, New Zealand, and the Gulf Cooperation Council in the Middle East. He has an eye for the “teachable moment” and the words to describe what he sees as skillful teaching. He delivers dynamic, humor-filled sessions that energize audiences with engaging strategies that transfer into immediate and practical on-site applications. School leaders often comment that Brian provides the best professional development the staff has ever had. Brian is coauthor of How to Teach Thinking Skills Within the Common Core: 7 Key Student Proficiencies of the New National Standards, School Leader’s Guide to the Common Core: Achieving Results Through Rigor and Relevance, Supporting Differentiated Instruction: A Professional Learning Communities Approach, From Staff Room to Classroom: A Guide for Planning and Coaching Professional Development, From Staff Room to Classroom II: The One-Minute Professional Development Planner, and The Right to Be Literate: 6 Essential Literacy Skills. His works in progress include two pieces, one on inquiry learning with a focus on problem-based learning, and the other on how to explicitly teach thinking skills in International Baccalaureate schools.

  • References

    Abrams, J., & von Frank, V. (2014). The multigenerational workplace: Communicate, collaborate, and create community. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
    Calvert, L. (2016). Moving from compliance to agency: What teachers need to make professional learning work. Oxford, OH: Learning Forward and National Commission on Teaching and America’s Future.
    Cronin, D. (2000). Click, clack, moo: Cows that type. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster.
    Danielson, C. (1996). Enhancing professional practice: A framework for teaching. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
    Dawson, G. (2015, October 1). Online professional development: Beyond PLCs and PLNs. Retrieved from https://www.edutopia.org/blog/online-pd-beyond-plcs-plns-gerard-dawson
    deBono, E. (1973). Lateral thinking: Creativity step by step. New York, NY: Harper Row.
    Fogarty, R. (2001). Finding the time and the money for professional development. Chicago, IL: Fogarty & Associates.
    Fogarty, R., & Pete, B. (2004a). The adult learner: Some things we know. Chicago, IL: Fogarty & Associates.
    Fogarty, R., & Pete, B. (2004b). A look at transfer: Seven strategies that work. Chicago, IL: Fogarty & Associates.
    Fogarty, R., & Pete, B. (2010, July). From Staff Room to Classroom Conference, Robin Fogarty & Associates, Chicago, IL.
    Fullan, M. (1982). The meaning of educational change. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.
    Fullan, M., & Stiegelbauer, E. (1991). The new meaning of educational change. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.
    Gardner, H. (1983). Frames of mind: The theory of multiple intelligences. New York, NY: Basic Books.
    Gladwell, M. (2000). The tipping point. Boston, MA: Little, Brown.
    Goodlad, J. (1983). A place called school: Prospects for the future. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.
    Guskey, T. (2000). Evaluating professional development. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
    Jackson, R. (2016, October 4). Teachers need developmental feedback, differentiated feedback, and deliberate support [Tweet] #msll16 #edchat #PD. Retrieved from https://twitter.com/robyn_mindsteps?lang=en
    Johnson, D. W., Johnson, R. T., & Holubec, E. J. (1986). Circles of learning: Cooperation in the classroom. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
    Johnson, D. W., Johnson, R. T., & Holubec, E. J. (1998). Cooperation in the classroom. Edina, MN: Interaction Book.
    Joyce, B., & Showers, B. (1983). Power in staff development through research on training. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
    Joyce, B., & Showers, B. (1995). Student achievement through staff development. New York, NY: Longman.
    Joyce, B., & Showers, B. (2002). Student achievement through staff development. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
    Kagan, S. (1989). Cooperation works. Educational Leadership, 47(4), 1215.
    Knowles, M. (1973). The adult learner: A neglected species. Houston, TX: Gulf Professional.
    Knowles, M., Holton, E., & Swanson, R. (1998). The adult learner: The definitive classic in adult education and human resource development (
    5th
    ed.). Woburn, MA: Butterworth-Heinemann.
    Kurshan, B. (2015, November 19). The teacher as the learner: Professional development for online and blended learning. Retrieved from http://www.forbes.com/sites/barbarakurshan/2015/11/19/the-teacher-as-the-learner-professional-development-for-online-and-blended-learning/#6f52bba22292
    Lieberman, A. (Ed.). (1988). Building a professional culture in schools. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.
    Little, J. W. (1975). The power of organizational setting: School norms and staff development. Paper adapted from final report to National Institute on Education, School success and staff development: The role of staff development in urban desegregated schools, 1981.
    National Center for Education Statistics. (2016). Fast Facts. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education.
    Pappas, C. (2015, January 25). The top eLearning statistics and facts for 2015 you need to know. Retrieved from https://elearningindustry.com/elearning-statistics-and-facts-for-2015
    Parnes, S. (1975). Aha insights into creative behavior. Buffalo, NY: DOK.
    Perkins, D., & Solomon, G. (1987). Teaching for transfer in developing minds: A resource book for teaching thinking (
    3rd
    ed.). Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
    Pete, B., & Fogarty, R. (2016, February 16). How to write problem scenarios [Web log post]. Retrieved from http://www.solution-tree.com/blog/how-to-write-problem-scenarios/
    Pete, B., & Sambo, C. (2004) Data! Dialogue! Decisions! The data difference. Chicago, IL: Fogarty & Associates.
    Priestley, T. (2015, December 30). Why the next generation after millennials will be ‘builders,’ not ‘founders.’ Retrieved from http://www.forbes.com/sites/theopriestley/2015/12/30/why-the-next-generation-after-millennials-will-be-builders-not-founders/#5fdaff886a36
    Sarason, S. (1982). The culture of school and the problem of change (
    2nd
    ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.
    Schmoker, M. (1996). Results: The key to continuous school improvement. Alexandria, VA: Association of Supervision and Curriculum Development.
    Schmuck, R., & Schmuck, P. (1997). Group processes in the classroom. Madison, WI: Brown & Benchmark.
    Standards for Professional Learning. (2011). Retrieved from https://learningforward.org/standards-for-professional-learning
    Zemke, R., Raines, C., & Filipczak, B. (2013). Generations at work: Managing the clash of boomers, gen Xers, and gen Yers in the workplace (
    2nd
    ed.). New York, NY: American Management Association.
    Zemke, R., & Zemke, S. (2015, March 31). Adult learning: What do we know for sure? Retrieved from https://trainingmag.com/adult-learning-what-do-we-know-sure (Original published 1995)

    • Loading...
Back to Top

Copy and paste the following HTML into your website