• Summary
  • Contents
  • Subject index

A comprehensive guide to effective participation in the public debate about our most indispensable right: freedom of expression

Encouraging readers to think critically about freedom of speech and expression and the diverse critical perspectives that challenge the existing state of the law, this text provides a comprehensive analysis of the historical and legal contexts of the First Amendment, from its early foundations all the way to censorship on the Internet. Throughout the book, authors Douglas M. Fraleigh and Joseph S. Tuman use the “Marketplace of Ideas” metaphor to help readers visualize a world where the exchange of ideas is relatively unrestrained and self-monitored.

The text provides students with the opportunity to read significant excerpts of landmark decisions and to think critically about the issues and controversies raised in these cases. Students will appreciate the treatment of contemporary issues, including free speech in a post-9/11 world, free expression in cyberspace, and First Amendment rights on college campuses.

Features:

Demystifies free speech law, encouraging readers to grapple with the complexities of significant ethical and legal issues; Sparks student interest in “big picture” issues while simultaneously covering important foundational material, including incitement, fighting words, true threats, obscenity, indecency, child pornography, hate speech, time place and manner restrictions, symbolic expression, restrictions on the Internet, and terrorism.; Includes significant excerpts from landmark freedom of expression cases, including concurring or dissenting opinions where applicable, to help students become active learners of free expression rights; Offers critical analysis and alternative perspectives on free expression doctrines to demonstrate that existing doctrine is not necessarily ideal or immutable; Includes a global perspective on free expression including a chapter on international and comparative perspectives that helps students see how the values of different cultures influence judicial decisions

Privacy and Free Speech
Privacy and free speech

In 2009, President Barack Obama was given his first opportunity to nominate a new justice to the United States Supreme Court. With due consideration, Obama offered up Judge Sonia Sotomayor, a former district attorney and judge for the Second Circuit Court of Appeals. Presidents are only allowed to nominate judges and justices, however—they cannot dictate selection as if it were an appointment process. The United States Senate is solely responsible for judicial confirmation of any nominees the White House puts forward. Judge Sotomayor's confirmation hearings were held in July of that same year. Like many of the nominees who had preceded her in other administrations, Sotomayor was treated with a mixture of respect, politeness, admiration, ignorance, praise, humor, ...

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