• Summary
  • Contents
  • Subject index

In E-learning Theory and Practice the authors set out different perspectives on e-learning. The book deals with the social implications of e-learning, its transformative effects, and the social and technical interplay that supports and directs e-learning.

The authors present new perspectives on the subject by:

Exploring the way teaching and learning are changing with the presence of the Internet and participatory media; Providing a theoretical grounding in new learning practices from education, communication and information science; Addressing e-learning in terms of existing learning theories, emerging online learning theories, new literacies, social networks, social worlds, community and virtual communities, and online resources; Emphasizing the impact of everyday electronic practices on learning, literacy and the classroom, locally and globally.

This book is for everyone involved in e-learning. Teachers and educators will gain an understanding of new learning practices, and learners will gain a sense of their new role as active participants in classroom and lifelong learning. Graduate students and researchers will gain insight into the direction of research in this new and exciting area of education and the Internet.

Researching E-Learning
Researching e-learning
Introduction

As the chapters in this book have stressed, e-learning is a multi-faceted phenomenon. It comprises intertwined social and technical dimensions that can be viewed for effects at individual, group and communal levels. Effects are more than pedagogical. As e-learning leaves the classroom and is found anywhere, anytime and with anyone, for education, work and leisure, it becomes woven into the fabric of everyday life and thus becomes a social and sociological concern. As an educational intervention, it changes patterns of long-standing relationships of authority and knowledge. In combination with trends to open source, open access, and participatory culture, the role of authoritative sources is changing (Haythornthwaite, 2009b; Jenkins et al., 2006; Willinsky, 2005). This includes the often-cited change of the teacher from ...

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